The Fragile X Syndrome Clinic at Emory

The Fragile X Syndrome Clinic at Emory serves children from birth through young adulthood. Our team includes physicians, scientists, and staff who have expertise in genetics, neurodevelopment, and neurobehavior.

Our clinical service is designed to meet the unique needs of individuals with Fragile X syndrome and their families. We provide specialized clinical services to support, complement, and augment the care provided by pediatricians, family practitioners, and other primary care providers.

Schedule an Appointment

To schedule an appointment: 

  • Please have your primary care doctor send in a referral.
  • We also ask that you fill out a questionnaire to provide us some basic information enabling us to prepare for your appointment.  

    Caregiver Questionnaire
  • For further scheduling information, you may call 404-778-8570 and request to speak with our Fragile X Clinic Nurse Coordinator

For further information about our clinic and services please call 404-778-1363.

Address

Department of Human Genetics
1365 Clifton Road, NE, Building B, Suite 2200
Atlanta, Georgia 30322.

Research

The Fragile X Syndrome Clinic at Emory is actively engaged with the Fragile X Clinics and Research Consortium (FXCRC) affiliated with the National Fragile X Foundation. The FXCRC is actively establishing "best practice" recommendations for evaluation and ongoing care in fragile X, enrolling fragile X families into a national registry to be used for research (the FORWARD registry), and research recruitment, and building a nationwide network for collaborative research efforts.

For more information about fragile X clinical research studies currently recruiting at Emory, please contact our clinical research coordinator at 404-778-8619 or email. 

For more information about the FORWARD registry, please call 404-778-8478, or email. 

Fragile X Premutation Information

Partnering Emory specialists are available to provide care for pre-mutation carriers related to FXTAS and FXPOI.

We gratefully acknowledge the Fragile X Association of Georgia and the Heyman Fragile X Outreach and Education Program at Emory University for their support.