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Doctor of Medicine Student Handbook

Introduction

Part I: PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

Part II: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY, REGULATIONS, PROCEDURES, AND REQUIREMENTS

Part III: Policies

Part IV: Medical Education and Student Affairs Administrative Units

Part V: Student Resources

Introduction

The Doctor of Medicine Student Handbook is a reference for medical students and others seeking information concerning the formal administrative policies, rules and regulations of Emory University and the School of Medicine.  In addition, this Student Handbook contains procedural policies for areas such as admissions, academic and professional standards, progress and promotion, financial aid, student organizations, student health, disability insurance, academic and personal counseling, and student health.  It is the responsibility of each student enrolled in the Emory University School of Medicine to read and abide by the regulations and policies within this handbook and within Emory University Publications.

Emory University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate, baccalaureate, master's, education specialist's, doctorate and professional degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404.679.4500 for questions about the accreditation of Emory.

Part I: PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

Section 1: Expectations

Overview

Emory University is an institution dedicated to providing educational opportunities for its students, transmitting and advancing knowledge, and providing a wide range of services to students and to the general community.  To accomplish these objectives and responsibilities requires that the University be free from violence, threats and intimidation; protective of free inquiry and dissent; respectful of the rights of others; open to change; supportive of democratic and lawful procedure; and dedicated to intellectual integrity and a rational approach to the resolution of human problems.

The tradition of the university as a sanctuary of academic freedom and center of informed discussion is an honored one, to be guarded vigilantly.  The basic significance of that sanctuary lies in the protection of intellectual freedoms: the rights of professors to teach; of scholars to engage in the advancement of knowledge; of students to learn and express their views.

Health professionals are privileged to serve in important and time honored roles as caregivers for other humans.  These roles include physical and emotional dimensions that demand the highest degree of ethical behavior among our professions. 

Ethical behavior includes, but is not in any way limited to honesty, trustworthiness, professional demeanor, respect for the rights of others, personal accountability, and concern for the welfare of patients: 

Honesty – Being truthful in communication with all others, while in the healthcare arena or in the community at large.

Maintenance of Patient Confidentiality – Restricting discussion of patient care to those areas where conversations cannot be overheard by others outside of the care team; refraining from disclosing patient identity to those not connected to the care of the patient; maintaining appropriate security for all paper and electronic patient records, whether in the patient care or research realms; 

Trustworthiness – Being dependable; following through on responsibilities in a timely manner; maintaining the confidentiality of patient information.

Professional Communication and Demeanor – Being thoughtful and kind when interacting with patients, their families, other members of the healthcare team, and all others; refraining from intoxication; abstaining from the illegal use of drugs (both prescription and illicit drugs); maintaining civility in all relationships; striving to maintain composure under pressures of fatigue, professional stress or personal problems; maintaining a neat and clean appearance and dress in attire that is reasonable and accepted as professional to the circumstances.

Respect for the rights of others – Dealing with all others, whether in a professional or non-professional setting, in a considerate manner and with a spirit of cooperation; respecting the rights of patients and their families to be informed and share in patient care decisions; respecting patients’ modesty and privacy.

Personal accountability – Participating responsibly in patient care to the best of one’s ability and with appropriate supervision; undertaking clinical duties and persevering until they are complete; notifying the responsible person if one is unable to perform clinical tasks effectively; complying with University Policies and Procedures in an honest and forthright manner.

Concern for the welfare of patients – Treating patients and their families with respect and dignity both in their presence and in discussions with others; avoiding the use of foul language, offensive gestures or inappropriate remarks with sexual overtones; discerning accurately when supervision or advice is needed and seeking these out before acting; recognizing when one’s ability to function effectively is compromised and asking for relief or help; never administering care, in person or over the phone while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs (prescription or illegal); not engaging in romantic, sexual, or other nonprofessional relationships with a patient, even upon the apparent request of a patient; advocating for the best care of the patient, in context of that patient’s beliefs and desires.

Responsibility to duty– Effectively undertaking duties with alacrity [eagerness, enthusiasm and promptness are synonyms] and persevering until complete, or notifying a responsible more senior person of a problem; being punctual for class, small groups, rounds, conferences and other duties; timely notification of supervisory faculty, residents and Deans of absences or an inability to carry out assigned duties; seeing patients regularly and assuming responsibility for their care with appropriate supervision; identifying emergencies and responding appropriately; and being available to faculty or staff personnel when on duty.

Standards of Dress and Appearance

This section describes standards for dress and appearance necessary to meet the service and safety objectives of placing patient comfort and welfare first, and the educational objectives of preparing the student to assume the role of a professional health care worker.

Patient trust and confidence in the health care provider are essential to excellent acute and chronic care.  The message communicated by the caregiver by his/her dress and appearance plays a fundamental role in establishing this trust and confidence.  Students should consider the cultural sensitivities of their most socially conservative patients and families.  Physicians-in-training should present themselves in a manner that will demonstrate respect, inspire trust, and ensure patient comfort.  Body art and body piercing, which may be acceptable in some social situations, should not be worn or displayed by medical students or physicians in professional settings.

The following guidelines help Emory students establish a successful caregiver-patient relationship:

During much of the Foundations Phase and at times during the remaining phases of the curriculum, students may spend time in lectures or other activities that do not involve patients.  While in lectures or small group activities that do not involve patient contact, attire should be comfortable but should not detract from the serious educational atmosphere. 

When patient contact is part of the educational experience or when students enter a clinical venue, students are expected to dress professionally.  This includes actual or standardized patient encounters in the hospital or clinic or lectures when a patient is present.  Professional dress is described below:

General Standards

For security purposes and for patient comfort in identifying professional personnel, nametags or badges should be worn at all times.  Good personal hygiene is to be maintained at all times.  This includes regular bathing, use of deodorants/antiperspirants, and regular dental hygiene.  Avoid perfumes or colognes, as they may precipitate allergic responses or be sensitizing to patients or colleagues.

Hair Maintenance

Hair should be neat, clean, and of a natural human color.  Hair should be styled off the face and out of the eyes.  Shoulder length hair should be secured to avoid interference with patients or work duties.  Avoid scarves or ribbons (unless culturally appropriate).  Beards/mustaches must be neatly trimmed.  Unless head coverings are required for religious or cultural reasons, hats should be avoided.

Clothing

Clothing should be clean, professionally styled, and in good repair.  Women should wear tailored slacks or dresses or skirts of medium length.  Men should wear slacks, a dress shirt and necktie.  Shorts and blue jeans are not appropriate professional dress.  All students should wear a clean, white, jacket-length coat over their clothing (or at the discretion of the supervising attending, professional dress without a white coat).  Shoes must be closed-toe, comfortable, clean and in good repair. 

IMPORTANT NOTES: scrub suits should be worn in specific patient care areas only.  They are the property of the hospital and are not to be defaced, altered, or removed from the hospital.  Stained or soiled scrub suits must be changed as soon as possible; they are a source of potential contamination.

Jewelry

Keep jewelry at a minimum, as it may have a potential for cross-infection.

Use of Social Media

As described above, behavior of students in the academic setting and beyond must be in keeping with the ideals of the institution and the profession of medicine.  The following paragraphs indicate the current standards for behavior that relate to the use of social media.

Each student is responsible for his or her postings on the internet and in social media.  In all communications, students are expected to be courteous, respectful, and considerate of others. Inappropriate postings on the internet or social media will be considered lapses in the standards of professionalism expected of Emory medical students. Students responsible for such postings are subject to the conduct code process as for other unprofessional behavior that occurs outside the academic setting and may face disciplinary actions including dismissal from the School of Medicine.

Students within the School of Medicine are urged to consider the following before posting any comments, videos, pictures, or essays to the internet or a social media site:

  1. There is no such thing as an “anonymous” post.  Furthermore, any posts or comments submitted for others to read should be posted with full identification. Where your connection to Emory is apparent, make it clear that you are speaking for yourself and not on behalf of Emory. A disclaimer, such as, "The views expressed on this [blog; website] are my own and do not reflect the views of my University or the School of Medicine" are required.
  2. Internet activities may be permanently linked to the author, so that all future employment (residency, fellowship and beyond) may be hampered by inappropriate behavior on the internet.
  3. Making postings “private” does not preclude others copying and pasting comments on public websites.  “Private” postings that become public are subject to sanctions described in the School of Medicine Conduct Code.
  4. Do not share information in violation of any laws or regulations. Disclosing information about patients without written permission of the patient and the School of Medicine, including photographs or potentially identifiable information is strictly prohibited. This rule applies to deceased patients also.
  5. For Emory’s protection as well as your own, it is critical that you show proper respect for the laws governing intellectual property, copyright and fair use of copyrighted material owned by others, including Emory’s own copyrights and brands.  Curricular materials developed by Emory faculty and staff or faculty/staff of other medical schools or educational institutions should not be used, distributed, or redistributed inappropriately.  When in doubt, students should seek guidance regarding appropriate use of such materials.
  6. Do not share confidential or proprietary information that may compromise Emory’s research efforts, business practices or security.

Section 2: Emory University School of Medicine Conduct Code

Given the goals of the University as a place of academic freedom, and the School of Medicine as a site of training for highly ethical health care providers, a system is necessary to provide the proper balance between the academic freedoms allowed a member of the University and his or her responsibility as a citizen of the University community and a future health care professional.  For this purpose and in accordance with the By-laws of the University, the President of the University has defined the interests of the University community to be promoted and protected by such a system and has delegated to the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs for the School of Medicine the responsibility of designing and maintaining a conduct code for Emory School of Medicine students.

The University community is necessarily pluralistic and its constituent elements varied and diverse.  A system is necessary to provide the proper balance between the academic freedoms allowed a member of the University and his or her responsibility as a citizen of the University community.  For this purpose and in accordance with the By-laws of the University, the President of the University has defined the interests of the University community to be promoted and protected by such a system and has delegated to the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs for the School of Medicine the responsibility of designing and maintaining a conduct code for medical and academic health students.

This Code may be reviewed annually and changes require the approval of the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs and review and approval by the Senior Vice President and Dean for Campus Life.  Provisions of this Code may be revised, supplemented, or amended at any time by action of the appropriate University authorities.

From the time a student matriculates as a medical or academic health student into the School of Medicine until the day of completion of his or her degree program and graduation from Emory University he or she is considered a student of the School of Medicine and governed by the principles set forth within this Conduct Code.

The Emory University School of Medicine Conduct Code pertains to misconduct of medical and academic health students enrolled in the School of Medicine outside of an academic setting.  Academic and professional discipline of students is not covered by this Code but rather falls within the jurisdiction of either the School of Medicine Honor Code or the Progress and Promotions Committee.

Basic Expectations/Inherent Authority

The primary purpose for the imposition of non-academic discipline in the School of Medicine setting is to protect and preserve the quality of the educational environment in the campus community.  This purpose entails several basic expectations:

  1. That the School of Medicine and the University at large assumes high standards of courtesy, integrity, and responsibility in all of its members;
  2. That each student is responsible for his/her conduct and that continuation as a student is conditional upon compliance with the requirements of student conduct expressed or implied in this Code.  

The School of Medicine reserves the right to take necessary and appropriate action to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community.  The Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs is charged with the welfare of all medical and health professions programs students.  Accordingly, in emergency situations, this individual has full authority to deal with student conduct according to the exigencies of the emergency and for its duration.

The School of Medicine is not designed or equipped to rehabilitate students who do not abide by this Code.  It may be necessary to remove those students from the campus and to sever the institution’s relationship with them as provided in this Code.  

The Senior Vice President and Dean for Campus Life is delegated responsibility pertaining to all student organizations and student government and, in conjunction with the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs, has the responsibility and authority to discipline such organizations whose members are students within the School of Medicine.

From the time a student is accepted as a student into the School of Medicine until the day of completion of his or her degree program and graduation from Emory University he or she is considered a student of the School of Medicine and governed by the principles set forth above. 

Confidentiality

Students’ conduct records are confidential and will not be released outside the University without the student’s specific written permission except as provided by applicable law.  If a student is found to have violated the Conduct Code, the resulting sanctions can be included in the Student’s Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) which is provided to residency programs as part of application for residency.  Conduct code violations and sanctions may also be reported to other agencies, such as the military, the federal government, licensing boards, and others if requested by the agency and accompanied by a signed release from the student.

Violations of the Law and This Code

Students may be accountable both to civil authorities and to the University for acts that constitute violations of law and of this Code.  Those accused of violations of this Code are subject to the disciplinary proceedings outlined in this Code while criminal, civil, or other internal proceedings regarding the same conduct are pending.  Accused students may not challenge the disciplinary proceedings outlined in this Code on the grounds that criminal charges, civil actions, or other internal proceedings regarding the same incident are pending, may be initiated, or have been terminated, dismissed, reduced, or not yet adjudicated.  The University will refer matters to federal, state, and local authorities for prosecution when appropriate.

Prohibited Conduct

Each student may be subject to this Code whether misconduct occurs on University premises, at University or School of Medicine sponsored activities, or at any location off-campus when such conduct is brought to the attention of the University or the School of Medicine.

It is neither possible nor necessary to specify every instance of misconduct that could result in disciplinary action against a student.  Violations of the Standards of Professionalism may also constitute “Prohibited Conduct” that is subject to this Code of Conduct.  The following list includes but is not limited to conduct that may subject a student to disciplinary action:

  1. Attempting, assisting, or encouraging any conduct as described below.
  2. Causing physical harm to any person or causing reasonable apprehension of such harm.
  3. Disorderly or indecent behavior including but not limited to destroying or damaging University property or the property of others.
  4. Engaging in conduct directed at a specific person or persons that seriously alarms or intimidates such person or persons and that serves no legitimate purpose.  Such conduct may include: explicit or implicit threats, including gestures that place a person in reasonable fear of unwelcome physical contact, harm, or death; following a person about in a public place or to or from his or her residence; making remarks in a public place to a specific person that are by common usage lewd, obscene, expose a person to public hatred, or that can reasonably be expected to have a tendency to cause acts of violence by the person to whom the remark is addressed; or communicating anonymously by voice or graphic means or making a telephone call anonymously whether or not a conversation ensues.
  5. Violating the University’s Policy on Sexual Misconduct.
  6. Violating the University’s Policy Statement on Discriminatory Harassment.
  7. Initiating or causing any false report, warning, or threat of fire, explosion, or other emergency.
  8. Misrepresenting information or furnishing false information to the University or its representatives.
  9. Forgery, alteration, misrepresentation, counterfeiting, or misuse of any University or other document, instrument of identification, or access device.
  10. Providing alcoholic beverages to an individual under 21 years of age or to one, who is noticeably intoxicated, or possession or use of alcoholic beverages by an individual less than 21 years of age.
  11. Unauthorized possession of an open container of an alcoholic beverage.
  12. Appearing in a public place manifestly under the influence of alcohol or a controlled or other intoxicating substance, particularly when there is danger to self, others, or property or there is unreasonable annoyance to person(s) in the vicinity.
  13. Unauthorized distribution, possession, or use of any controlled substance or distribution, possession, or use of any illegal drug.
  14. Unauthorized use, possession, or storage of any weapon.
  15. Unauthorized use or possession of fireworks of incendiary, dangerous, or noxious devices or materials.
  16. Intentionally or recklessly misusing or damaging fire or other safety equipment.
  17. Theft or misuse of property or services.
  18. Substantially interfering with the freedom of expression of others.
  19. Interfering with normal University or School of Medicine functions, University-sponsored activities, or any function or activity on University premises including but not limited to studying, teaching, public speaking, research, University or School of Medicine administration, or fire, police, or emergency services.
  20. Disregarding or failing to comply with the directive of a hearing body or University official including a campus police officer acting in the performance of his or her duties.
  21. Disregarding or failing to comply with the directive of an officer of the law acting in the performance of his or her duties.
  22. Disrupting University or other computer systems; unauthorized alteration, disclosure, gaining or providing unauthorized access; or destruction of University or other computer system or material; improper access to University or other computer files and systems; or violation of copyright or proprietary material restrictions connected with University or other computer systems, programs, or materials.
  23. The display or distribution of lewd, offensive, threatening or inappropriate material via paper or electronic means.  Such material includes pictures, videos, or written content that portray oneself or others in a manner that brings dishonor to the profession of medicine. 
  24. Violating any government laws or ordinances, or of any University or School of Medicine rules, regulations, or policies including but not limited to the “Standards of Professionalism” set forth above.  Such rules, regulations, or policies shall include but are not to be limited to the regulations and policies contained in the Campus Life Handbook, Information Technology Division (ITD) materials, Policy Statement on Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Assault Policy Statement, School of Medicine Medical Student Handbook or Allied Health Student Handbook; regulations relating to entry (opening and closing hours) and use of University facilities; traffic and parking regulations; regulations and policies on the sale, consumption or misuse of alcoholic beverages; and on the misuse of identification cards.
  25. Failure to report any arrests, criminal charges, positive results of drug tests or Criminal Background Checks (CBCs) that occur from the time of enrollment until graduation. 

Conduct Procedures

Anyone wishing to report an alleged incident of misconduct under this Code may make such a report to the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA or to any Assistant or Associate Dean for OMESA.  Reports generated by the Emory Police will be forwarded to the Assistant Dean for Campus Life and to the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA.  The Executive Associate Dean for OMESA will make a determination as to whether or not an action should be taken in response to a report.  If it is determined that further action should be taken, the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA will notify the student in writing that he or she must make an appointment for a preliminary meeting within five days of the date on the notice for the purpose of reviewing the report.  Failure to schedule or attend this preliminary meeting will automatically result in formal charges as described below.

Following this preliminary meeting, an investigator (faculty member) will be appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA to conduct an investigation to determine if the report has merit. The investigator may recommend the matter should proceed to formal charges or be disposed of administratively by agreement of the parties involved on a basis acceptable to the Executive Associate Dean.   

If the matter is not so resolved, the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA will then meet again with the student and present the student with a letter stating the formal charges and a copy of all documents relevant to the case.

If a student admits to having violated the Code of Conduct as charged, the student shall have the following options as to how sanctions will be determined:

  1. The student may waive his or her right to a hearing and have the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA determine the appropriate sanction.
  2. The student may choose a hearing with a Conduct Committee appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA to determine the appropriate sanctions.  

This selection shall be made in writing within five days and be recorded by the Executive Associate Dean. 

If the student does not admit to having violated the Code of Conduct as charged, the charges will be referred for a hearing and a copy of all documents relevant to the case will be forwarded to the appropriate hearing body and the student involved.

If an accused student fails to respond to any notification in writing concerning the conduct process, his or her case will be automatically referred to a hearing with an ad hoc conduct committee.  

The School of Medicine reserves the right to place a “hold” on the diploma, degree certification, or official transcripts of a student who has been charged with a conduct violation under the Code even though he or she may have completed all academic requirements.  The diploma, degree certification, or official transcripts may be withheld until the conduct charges have been resolved and/or sanctions completed.    

Student Conduct Hearing Boards

School of Medicine Conduct Committee

The School of Medicine Conduct Committee is an ad hoc committee appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs to hear non-academic medical or health professions programs student conduct cases.  The Conduct Committee is composed of:

  1. A Chair appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for the Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs (OMESA), who shall be a faculty member but not a voting member of the Council and an alternate;
  2. Two voting faculty members and one alternate;
  3. One voting School of Medicine administrator (Dean, Director, Associate or Assistant Dean) and one alternate;
  4. Three voting student members (medical students or academic health students, determined by the school enrollment status of the student accused of misconduct) and one alternate.    

The Conduct Committee must have a minimum of five members present in order to convene, two of whom must be faculty. 

Hearing Procedures

 The Executive Associate Dean for OMESA may require any student, faculty, or staff member of the School of Medicine to attend and/or testify at any hearing or meeting regarding a conduct matter that is covered under this Code.

Whenever a hearing is to be held regarding an alleged incident of misconduct under this Code, the accused student and the complainant, if any, shall be given at least seven (7) calendar days written notice of the charges alleged against the accused student and of the date, time, and place of the hearing.

The ad hoc Conduct Committee shall conduct the hearing. The committee may require witnesses to testify at the hearing who are students, faculty, or staff of the School of Medicine and who are available to attend.  Rules of evidence that apply in courts of law shall not apply in such hearings.  The hearing shall be closed to everyone except the hearing body, appropriate staff, the accused student, and the complainant, advisors to the accused student and the complainant, and witnesses during the actual time to their testimony.

An advisor of his or her choice may assist the accused student and the complainant.  The advisor must be a member of the Emory University School of Medicine faculty or staff or a student currently enrolled in the School of Medicine.  The Chair of the Conduct Committee will consider exceptions.  The advisor may not be an attorney.  

Both parties and/or their advisors are allowed to:

  1. Be present at the hearing until such time as the hearing body retires to deliberate the decision.  However, if either the student or the advisor or the complainant fails to appear at the hearing, the hearing may be held in their absence.
  2. Present tangible and documentary evidence and evidence by witness or by signed witness statements of witnesses who do not attend the hearing including the signed written statements of the complainant or the accused.  If witnesses fail to appear, the hearing shall be held in their absence.  
  3. It is the responsibility of the accused student and of the complainant to notify any additional witnesses not called by the hearing body.  Additional witnesses must have the prior approval of the Chair of the hearing body.  All witnesses should be notified of the date, time, and place of the hearing.
  4. Question all witnesses who give evidence at the hearing directly or through written questions presented through the Chair.  

The Chair of the ad hoc Conduct Committee shall have final decision on what evidence may be presented and the tone of questioning.  The Chair may decide to stop questions at any time.

Hearing Decisions

The decisions of the Conduct Committee as to both violation and sanctions are in all cases advisory to the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA.  The ad hoc Conduct Committee shall deliberate and decide whether the accused student has violated this Code.  The hearing body may decide that the student is in violation of a less serious offense than that originally charged.  A determination that a student has violated the School of Medicine Conduct Code requires a simple majority vote. In the case of a tie, the Chair shall cast the deciding vote.

If the finding of a violation is determined, the hearing body shall be provided with the record of previous disciplinary proceedings in which the student was found in violation.  On the basis of the hearing and the student’s previous record, a decision will be made regarding sanctions by a simple majority vote.  In the case of a tie, the Chair shall cast the deciding vote.

A written decision will be issued from the hearing committee to the student within seven (7) days of the date of the hearing.  The accused shall receive written notice of the outcome of the hearing which includes:  (1) a statement of charges; (2) a summary of the facts in the case; (3) the decision; (4) a brief statement of the hearing body’s reasoning; and, if a violation is found, (5) sanction(s).  The accused student will also receive information on the rights of appeal. The Executive Associate Dean for OMESA shall review all decisions of the Conduct Committee. The Dean of the School of Medicine shall also review any decision resulting in a sanction of suspension or expulsion.  The EAD and the Dean shall make a final decision regarding the recommendations of the Hearing Committee.

Sanctions

The following sanctions, singularly or in combination, may be imposed upon any student found to have violated the School of Medicine Conduct Code:

  1. Warning:  A notice in writing to the student that the student has violated institutional regulations and must cease and not repeat the inappropriate action.
  2. Probation:  A written reprimand for violation of specific regulations.  Probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period.
  3. Restitution:  Compensation for loss, damage, or injury.  This may take the form of service, monetary compensation, or material replacement.
  4. Discretionary Sanctions: Work assignments or service to the School of Medicine, the University or the community.
  5. Suspension:  Separation of the student from the School of Medicine for a definite period of time, after which the student may be eligible to return.  Conditions for readmission may be specified.
  6. Expulsion:  Permanent separation of the student from the School of Medicine.  

Conduct sanctions (5) Suspension and (6) Expulsion shall be entered permanently on a student’s record.  Sanction (2) Probation shall be entered on a student’s record for the term of the probation. Any sanction may include mandatory referral to university-based resources for medical or mental health evaluation and treatment if necessary. An evaluation supporting the student’s reentry to medical school may be needed before reentry into course or clerkships.

Appeal

The accused student may appeal decisions rendered by the Conduct Committee to the Dean of the School of Medicine. To initiate an appeal, the accused student must submit a signed, written statement of the specific reason(s) to the Dean within seven (7) days of receipt of the hearing decision.

The Dean will review the process and the decision to determine:

  1. Whether or not the hearing was conducted in accordance with the procedures outlined in the Conduct Code;
  2. Whether or not the interpretation of the code was appropriate;
  3. Whether or not the sanction(s) imposed were appropriate.  
  4. After reviewing the documents pertaining to the case, the Dean will issue a written review of the hearing decision with a reasonable period of time from the receipt of the request for review. 

The Dean will either:

  1. Affirm the hearing decision;
  2. Affirm the findings of the hearing decision but recommend a different sanction; OR
  3. Remand the case to the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs to assign a new ad hoc School of Medicine Conduct Appeal Board to conduct a new hearing.    

School Of Medicine Conduct Appeal Board

The Appeal Board will be established at the time the Dean remands a case to the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs for conducting a new hearing. 

The Board shall be composed of:

      (1)  One voting administrator appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for OMESA;

      (2) Up to three voting faculty members appointed by the Dean. 

      (3) One voting medical or allied health student, depending on the status of the

             accused, appointed by the Dean.  

The Appeal Board shall follow the same guidelines as the initial hearing, reviewing the case independently, and make a final recommendation to the Dean.  The decision of the Dean shall then be final.  The Executive Associate Dean for OMESA shall provide the recommendation of the School of Medicine Conduct Appeal Board to the Dean whose decision shall be final.

Notification and Retention of Records

The Executive Associate Dean for OMESA shall forward notification of all final action to the Dean.  The Executive Associate Dean shall maintain files on all medical and academic health students’ conduct reports, records, and hearing proceedings according to procedures established by that office.          

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Part II: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY, REGULATIONS, PROCEDURES, AND REQUIREMENTS

Section 1: Academic Integrity

Statement

Academic integrity is defined as a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to six fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility, and courage1. The Emory University School of Medicine seeks to involve every member of the community in cultivating a culture of academic integrity and promoting communal standards. 

Pursuant to this goal, the students, faculty, and administration of the Emory University School of Medicine have created the Honor Code, which presents our standards of academic integrity and outlines the consequences for violations thereof.

This section of the student handbook outlines the School of Medicine Honor Code, along with academic regulations and procedures, promotional guidelines, graduation requirements, and the granting of awards and honors.

1International Center for Academic Integrity.  http://www.academicintegrity.org/icai/assets/Revised_FV_2014.pdf

EUSOM Honor Code

Preamble
The students, faculty, and administration of the Emory University School of Medicine join together in support of this MD STUDENT HONOR CODE for the purposes of (a) providing an atmosphere of mutual trust, concern, and respect; (b) fostering honorable and ethical behavior; and c) cultivating lifelong professional conduct. 

To promote this purpose, matters regarding academic misconduct shall fall under the jurisdiction of the Honor Code, while other aspects of a student’s medical education will be covered by the guidelines stated in the Student Conduct Code.  Students who matriculate in the Emory University School of Medicine are obligated to uphold the Honor Code.

Statement of the MD Student Honor Code
Any action indicating lack of integrity or dishonesty in academic matters is considered a violation of academic ethics.  Such offenses include, but are not limited to, engaging in or attempting to engage in cheating, plagiarism, sabotage, falsifying or manipulating data, misrepresenting attendance, or knowingly passing off work of another as one’s own.

Honor Code Violations Definitions and Policies include:

          “On my honor, I have neither given nor received any aid on this

          (examination, quiz, or paper), nor am I aware of anyone who did.” 

 

          However, absence of this pledge does not exempt the student or the assignment

          from the obligations set forth under this Honor Code

 

The Medical Student Council on Honor

The Medical Student Council on Honor, hereafter, referred to as the Honor Council, will have primary jurisdiction ov er the supervision of the Honor Code as applies to medical students. A separate Academic Health Council on Honor will supervise the Honor Code as applies to academic health students.

The Medical Student Honor Council will consist of 5 (five) elected student representatives (1 M1, 1 M2, 1 M3, and a Chair and Vice-Chair both elected from the M4 class), approved by the Dean (or his/her designee, hereafter called the Dean), and 2 (two) faculty members appointed by the Dean.  Two alternate members from each class will be elected and approved by the Dean.  In addition, the Dean will appoint two faculty member alternates in basic science and two in clinical education.

Student Representatives

In April of each academic year following implementation, the members and alternates of the rising M2, M3, and M4 classes will be elected by their own class members to serve on the Honor Council for a one-year term.  The elections will be open to any student, including previous members of the Honor Council, who wishes to run. No one previously found to be in violation of the Honor Code is allowed to serve.

M1 students will elect Honor Council members and alternates following the first two months of classes. Vacancies will be filled by special election of the respective student classes.   

Faculty Representatives

To establish a pool of four faculty members, two of whom are replaced each year, the following process will be utilized:

Leadership of the Honor Council – The Spring Elections

Procedures for Reporting Violations and Investigating Violations

  1. If an individual believes that a violation of the Honor Code has occurred, that individual must report the violation as soon as possible to any member of the Honor Council.  Failure to report the violation will itself constitute a violation of the Honor Code.
  2. Once an allegation has been made, the individual making that allegation must draft, sign, and submit to the Honor Council Secretary a brief statement for Honor Council documentation.
  3. Upon notification of a possible violation of the Honor Code, the following will occur:
  4. The Council Secretary will inform the Honor Council Chair that a violation has been reported and an investigation has been initiated.
  5. The Council Secretary will then choose two investigators from available alternate Council members whose responsibility it will be to gather information about the case. 
  6. The Chair shall subsequently inform the Council faculty members and the Executive Associate Dean of OMESA that an investigation is being conducted, but the name of the student and details of the incident will remain known only to the Chair, the Secretary, the investigators, and any individuals the Chair may deem necessary.
  7. The student named in the allegation will be informed of the investigation prior to its onset.  Should the student be a member of the First or Second Year Medical School Class, he or she will be informed by the Chair of the Honor Council.  If the student under investigation is a member of the Third and Fourth Year Class, one of the faculty members of the Honor Council will inform the student. 

    1. After information concerning the case has been gathered, this information shall be submitted to the Chair of the Honor Council, who along with the two investigators, will judge whether sufficient evidence exists to warrant a formal hearing.  Among the Chair and two investigators, the decision to continue with a formal hearing or cease the investigation will rest upon the concurrent views of at least two of the three participants.
    2. If a hearing is deemed warranted, the student will be notified by the Secretary of the Honor Council in writing of the date, time, and place of the Hearing; the nature of the violation with which the student is charged; the evidence of the investigation, including the name of the individual making the initial allegation. Upon notification of the hearing, the student will be provided with a list of available advisors with whom to consult, at the student’s discretion.
    3. The hearing will take place within a reasonable time (no more than 21 days) after the accusation is reported to the Honor Council.  (In rare instances, a different time period may be determined by the Honor Council based upon the specific circumstances of the case).
    4. The student will be permitted to continue academic endeavors until a final decision is made.  The student and advisor may review and gather evidence prior to the hearing.
    5. For each hearing, the Honor Council will consist of seven members:  five student members [the Chair (or Vice-Chair) and four student members consisting of one member from each class] and two faculty members.  If members decide they cannot serve for any reason, including conflict of interest, or if representation from each class is not possible, then an alternate member will sit on the Honor Council.  The alternate members who serve as investigators will present pertinent information but will not be allowed to vote in the proceedings or to be present during deliberations.

      1. It will be the responsibility of the Secretary to inform the Honor Council members of the alleged violation (date, person involved, and nature of the accusation).
      2. The Chair (or Vice-Chair) will preside over the hearing and participate in discussion and deliberation of the case but will not have a vote.

The Hearing

Rules of law do not apply to any hearings or proceedings regarding the Honor Code.          

Order of Proceeding

  1. Call to order.
  2. Reading of Parts I and II of the Honor Code (Preamble and Statement of the Honor Code).
  3. Statement of the alleged Honor Code violation.
  4. Presentation of evidence: The investigators and the accused may present testimony and other evidence as appropriate and relevant to the case.  The Chair and members of the Honor Council, the accused, and the advisor to the accused may ask questions of witnesses, but the Chair shall have the right to determine whether such questions are appropriate.
  5. Discussion and deliberation by the Council is held in a private executive session. 

Rules Governing Proceedings

  1. All hearings will be conducted in closed-door session and will remain confidential.
  2. Participants in the hearing will be limited to the following:

    1. Chair (or Vice-Chair) of the Honor Council.
    2. Members of the Honor Council to include the Secretary or, if needed, a temporary secretary appointed by the permanent secretary.
    3. Student accused of violation.
  3. Two alternate Council members who serve as investigators for the case.
  4. Relevant witnesses who may be present only while testifying.
  5. Advisor for the accused. 
  6. The Secretary or his/her appointee will take notes during the hearing and make them available to the Honor Council.
  7. The accused has the option of selecting an individual from the School of Medicine, but not a member of the Honor Council, to assist in an advisory capacity prior to the hearing and to be present at the hearing.  This individual will not be permitted to testify or to make statements of any nature other than asking questions. 

Decision and Penalties

  1. For a student to be found guilty of an Honor Code violation, the unanimous vote of the six voting members of the Honor Council will be required [the Chair (or Vice-Chair) will not be eligible to vote]. 
  2. The penalty recommended for an Honor Code violation will be by plurality vote of the six voting members of the Honor Council.  In case of a tie, the Chair (or Vice-Chair) will cast a vote.
  3. The Dean will be informed promptly following the decision of the Honor Council.
    1. Recommendation for penalties regarding violations of the Statement of the Honor Code.
    2. The standard penalty for violation of the Honor Code is (a) mandatory leave of absence from Emory University School of Medicine for at least one academic term (semester) if the student is in the first or second year of medical school, or for at least four months if the student is in the third or fourth year of medical school; and (b) a grade of “Incomplete” for all courses in which the student is enrolled at the time of the infraction.
    3. The Honor Council may recommend to the Dean a penalty more severe than a mandatory leave of absence (e.g., permanent expulsion) or may recommend a less severe penalty (e.g., disciplinary probation for Honor Code violation), dependent upon the circumstances of the case.
    4. Upon receipt of a mandatory leave of absence, the student cannot advance to the next term until he/she has completed the term in which the “Incomplete” grades were given.
    5. If the student is in the first or second year of medical school, he/she will return from a mandatory leave of absence to the beginning of the uncompleted term.  If the student is in the third or fourth year of medical school, he/she will return from a mandatory leave of absence to the beginning of the uncompleted clerkship.  

Decision of the Dean of the School of Medicine
The final decision rests with the Dean.  The decision of the Dean will be effective immediately unless there is an appeal.  The appeal, including the basis for the appeal, must be submitted by the student in writing to the Dean within one week after the decision of the Dean.  If an appeal is requested, an ad hoc committee consisting of three faculty members from the School of Medicine will be appointed by the Dean.  The committee will review the data and render its recommendation to the Dean for upholding or repealing the decision, following which the Dean will issue the final decision in the matter. 

Amendments to the Honor Code

Amendments to the Honor Code may be proposed by the Honor Council at any point in the academic year; proposed amendments must be approved by the Dean before becoming effective.  If an amendment is approved while a case is under active review that amendment will not apply to that case.  Any new amendment, once approved, will become effective as soon as all medical students have been notified of the change via mail or email.    

Section 2: Attendance

Overview     

Active participation in the medical education program is critical to students’ development as physicians. Although attendance is expected at all scheduled classes, attendance is mandatory at all small group sessions, preceptorships, and patient presentations.  Attendance is also mandatory for all examinations, including written, oral, and observed clinical structured exams (OSCEs). Attendance is likewise mandatory for class meetings. Daily attendance during clinical clerkships is mandatory, except for required days off as outlined below. 

Duty Hours on Clinical Clerkships

During the clinical clerkships, students must adhere to the duty hour guidelines as outlined by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Duty hours must be limited to 80 hours per week, averaged over a four-week period, inclusive of all in-house activities. Students must be scheduled for a minimum of one day free of duty every week (when averaged over four weeks). The student maximum duty period length must not exceed 16 hours in duration and should have a minimum of 10 hours off between scheduled duty periods.

Punctuality

In addition to attendance, it is considered part of professional behavior and the responsibility of the student to arrive on time for classes, small group sessions, clinical rounds, and scheduled examinations. Late arrival disrupts teachers, classmates, and others.

Arriving Late for or Missing an Examination

Students who arrive after an examination has begun may be refused admission to the examining room, thus jeopardizing their module or clerkship grade.  Unexcused absences from a scheduled exam will result in a grade of “U” (in Foundations) or “F” (in Applications) for that examination.  The final grade of a clerkship will account for the failed examination grade as determined by the clerkship director.   Unexcused absences from NBME or OSCE exams will result in the student being charged for any additional costs associated with rescheduling of the examination. 

Students who are late to an examination or other required sessions as outlined above, are subject to an Unprofessional Conduct Report being submitted to the Progress and Promotions Committee.

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Section 3: Absences

Excused absences

Excused absences will be considered for the following circumstances:

  1. Medical or family emergency
  2. Scholarly presentation at an academically relevant national meeting
  3. Running for or holding national office in a professionally relevant national organization
  4. Residency Interviews

During clinical clerkships, students may be granted one day excused absence for residency interviews per each two weeks of the clinical rotation. This day is in addition to the student’s one day off for each seven days of clinical service, as dictated by ACGME duty hour guidelines. Students must seek prior approval from the clerkship director for any absences due to residency interviews and notify the Associate Dean for Clinical Education or his or her designee. Students should not schedule interviews during required clerkship events. If this is not possible and residency interviews conflict with mandatory clerkship requirements, students must make arrangements for completion of those requirements prior to the end of the rotation.

  1. Participation in Interview and Tour Guides Related to the Admissions Process

The Associate Dean for Clinical Education excuses absences from clerkships for such assistance as deemed reasonable for the Admission interview process. Students will not be allowed to miss mandatory components of any clerkship to serve as an interviewer and tour guide, however. The student should notify the clerkship director and team members as far in advance as possible regarding these absences.

  1. Religious observances

The Emory School of Medicine recognizes and respects the significance of student religious beliefs and practices. While the School of Medicine calendar includes only religious observances recognized as U.S. federal holidays, the school seeks to accommodate student religious needs reasonably within the requirements of the academic schedule.  There shall be no adverse or prejudicial effect resulting to any student requesting excused absences for religious observances.

Requesting Absences

Students requesting an excused absence for any of the above reasons must request permission as far in advance as possible. Requests should be sent to the following deans:

Students unable to meet as scheduled with individual preceptors must ALSO notify the preceptor personally as well as the course director and appropriate dean’s office.  Written notification of excused absences will be sent to the course or clerkship directors when appropriate.

Any required sessions, clerkship days or examinations must be made up in a manner suitable to the clerkship or module director and the Executive Associate Dean or his or her designee.  Whenever possible, missed work should be completed within 6 weeks of the original assignment. 

In addition to excused absences as outlined above, permission for any deviation from the academic schedule must be obtained from the Executive Associate Dean or his or her designee.  During Foundations, the designee is the Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Admissions, or the Assistant Dean of Medical Education and Student Affairs. During Applications, Discovery, and Translations, the designee is the Associate Dean for Clinical Education.  

Reporting Absences

Students in the Foundations Phase of the curriculum should report absences to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Admissions or the Assistant Dean for Medical Education.  Student absences in the Applications, Discovery and Translations Phases of the curriculum should be reported to the Associate or Assistant Dean for Clinical Education.  In addition, students must report absences to clerkship directors and clinical faculty with whom they are working.

When absence due to illness extends beyond 48 hours, a signed physician’s report may be required (from the University Health Service or from the student’s personal physician).

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Section 4: Leave of Absence

Requests for leave of absence (LOA) may be granted by the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs or his/her designee or when recommended by a faculty committee. LOA may be granted, if deemed appropriate, for health, personal, or family reasons, or for special academic study. A LOA is generally granted for a period of one year or less, and readmission is automatic at the time agreed upon when the request is made, provided any issues necessitating the leave have been dealt with appropriately. If for any reason the LOA extends beyond one year, the student must apply for readmission, unless a longer period for special study is approved by the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs or his/her designee. The LOA does not extend the six-year period allowed for completion of the standard MD degree unless the approved leave involves an academic course of study longer that two years to qualify for a degree or certificate. The fact that this LOA will take more than two years must be made clear in writing to the Executive Associate Dean when requesting approval for the LOA.

All students requesting a LOA must:

  1. Request the LOA in a letter specifying both the LOA start, and the return to medical school dates,
  2. Meet with the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs or his/her designee, and
  3. Receive a letter from the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs or his/her designee approving the leave.

Discussion about planned absences (e.g. for special academic study) whether involving study at Emory, or away from Emory, should be made as far in advance of the absence as possible, and preferably during the application process for the special academic course of study. Optimally, written requests for such absences should be made at least 3 months in advance.

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Section 5: Student Assessment and Grading

Assessment, Evaluation, and Grading

Assessments are measurements of student performance conducted using psychometrically appropriate instruments such as written exams or observational checklists.  Evaluations are comprehensive summaries of student performance measured against a performance standard.  Grades are assigned based on data collected from both assessments and summative evaluations.

In addition to traditional educational assessments, such as written exams or laboratory practical exams, observational assessments of students’ academic and professional performance are also incorporated into grading, when appropriate.  Peer or instructor observational assessments are often used during small group work, during patient care on clerkships, for elective courses, and for clinical skills exams.  Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs) are a regular and vital element of student assessment.

Observational assessments are critical to clinical evaluations and are accumulated into determining letter grades.  Observational assessments are also taken into account during discussions of promotion and graduation.

Grading Scales

A-F

The letter grades “A” through “F” indicate the quality of academic performance as measured by various assessment instruments and processes.  Modifiers of ‘plus’ or ‘minus’ with letter grades are also used. Letter grades are derived from a comprehensive evaluation of a student’s achievement, both academically and professionally. Grades are assigned based on published criteria.

“A” indicates exceptional performance

“B” indicates good performance with no identified weaknesses

“C” indicates acceptable performance with improvement needed

“D” indicates unacceptable performance on at least one criterion and no academic credit is awarded

“F” indicates unacceptable performance on multiple criteria and no academic credit is awarded

A student cannot be promoted to the next phase of the curriculum with a grade of “D” or “F” on their transcript. Any student who receives a “D” or “F” will, at a minimum have to repeat the clerkship, and will be susceptible to additional actions such as probation or dismissal, as determined by the Progress and Promotions Committee.

S/U

“S” indicates satisfactory work; Pass

“U” indicates unsatisfactory work and carries no academic credit; Fail

A grade of “U” carries no academic credit. A student cannot be promoted to the next phase of the curriculum with a grade of “U” on their transcript. Any student who receives a “U” will, at a minimum have to repeat the course, and will be susceptible to additional actions such as probation or dismissal, as determined by the Progress and Promotions Committee.

IP and I

“IP” indicates ‘in-progress’ course work. Final transcripts cannot carry grades of “IP”.

“I” indicates incomplete course work.

The grade of “I” will be assigned to students who have been unable to complete the requirements of the course/clerkship due to absences approved by the dean’s office. The grade of “I” is appropriate only when enough work has been completed at an acceptable level of performance such that the student can complete the remaining work without repeating the entire course/clerkship.

If a student receives a grade of “I”, the remaining work must be completed within a reasonable time, as determined by Associate Dean for Clinical Education, or the grade of “I” will automatically convert to an “F”. The grade of “I” cannot be assigned for unsatisfactory work. The grade of “I” is to be viewed as a non-prejudicial entry on the student’s record.

W

“W” indicates withdrawal from course or clerkship without penalty

“WF” indicates withdrawal failing

“WU” indicates unsatisfactory withdrawal

Grading in the Foundations Phase

In the Foundations Phase of the curriculum, grades “S” and “U” are assigned to students. When appropriate, students may also be assigned the grades of “I”, “IP”, “W”, “WF”, or “WU”.

Students may not progress to the Applications Phase of the curriculum without receiving a final grade of “S” in all Foundations courses.

Grading in the Applications, Discovery, and Translations Phases

In the Applications, Discovery, and required clerkship portion of the Translations Phases of the curriculum, grades “A+” through “F” are assigned to students. For electives taken during in the Translations Phase, grades of “S” or “U” are assigned.  When appropriate, students may also be assigned the grades of “I”, “IP”, “W”, “WF”, or “WU”. 

If a student fails any aspect of a clerkship that is required to pass the clerkship, the student will receive a failing grade (“D” or “F”) for the clerkship and be required to repeat the clerkship in its entirety. A second grade will be issued after repetition of the clerkship; however, the “D” or “F” grade earned after completing the clerkship for the first time will remain on the student’s official transcript.

Students must successfully complete all Applications clerkships before proceeding to the next phases of the curriculum.

Completion of Clerkship Requirements

All clerkship requirements must be completed by 5pm on the final day of the rotation, including but not limited to patient logs in OASIS and direct observation forms. Students who fail to complete clerkship requirements on time will be subjected to penalties outlined by the clerkship directors and may result in a grade deduction or a failing grade for the clerkship.

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Section 6: Grade Appeals

Students are encouraged to discuss evaluations of them and their final grades with the module, course, clerkship, or elective director. Overall grades are calculated to be an accurate and a fair representation of a student’s work. Nonetheless, students have the right to appeal a grade and to receive a fair and thorough independent review of the grading criteria and their performance.

If a student wishes to appeal a final grade, this should be presented in writing to the Executive Associate Dean of Medical Education and Student Affairs (EAD), within 30 days of receiving the grade. The appeal may be based on the process that led to the grade and/or questions of factual content used in the evaluation process. The EAD will then review the basis for the appeal of the evaluation and/or grade.

Upon review, the EAD may find that there is no basis, based on process or factual content, for a change of an evaluation or grade. Alternatively, the EAD may recommend that the module, course, clerkship, or elective director consider any of the following:

  1. for questions regarding factual content, the EAD may recommend that the course/clerkship director submit assessment tools to a group of faculty in the field for review;
  2. for questions regarding process or factual content, the EAD may suggest additional assessment of student performance and subsequent reconsideration of the grade;
  3. the EAD may suggest a change of grade.

The module, course, clerkship, or elective director will then consider the recommendation made by the EAD and submit a written response to the EAD and a reconsidered grade. All grade appeals, along with responses by the module, course, clerkship, or elective director and the EAD, will be forwarded to the Chair of the Progress and Promotions Committee, for its information and record.

After review by the EAD and submission of the reconsidered grade, the student may appeal any decision to the Dean of the medical school. The decision by the Dean shall be final.

It should be noted that any and all grade appeals should be conducted in a professional manner by the student involved; that is, demonstrating respectful disagreement with the perspective and judgment used by faculty members. Failure to exhibit appropriate professional attitudes may immediately terminate the appeal process and lead to an unprofessional conduct report.

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Section 7: Remediation

Remediation for the Foundations Phase

The goals of remediation are to identify those students who have not achieved minimal competency during a Module examination and to ensure they become competent before moving on to the Applications Phase of the curriculum.

The Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs (OMESA) will notify students of their need to remediate no later than three weeks after exam completion. The student must contact the module director within one week after this notification. It is the responsibility of the student to schedule remediation with the module director. The first attempt at remediation should occur by the week following the next school break.

Students requiring remediation must meet with the director of the module to be remediated. If, during this conversation, the student identifies a non-academic contributor to their poor performance (i.e., something medical or social), this should be brought to the attention of the Executive Associate Dean or his/her designee within 24 hours.

The process for remediation, as determined by the module director, will be tailored to the individual student through the identification and correction of specific areas of deficiency.  Retaking the entire module exam is only appropriate if the student’s performance in all major content areas is unsatisfactory.

The module director will give to OMESA a record of the remediation process for each student. This will be part of the student’s record. Failure to demonstrate adequate competence will necessitate additional remediation by the student.  

To more readily identify students in academic difficulty and offer them additional support services in a timely fashion, students who need to remediate more than one module will be provided with information on receiving a learning assessment, the results of which may trigger further support services that may help the student avoid the need to remediate additional modules.

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Section 8: Graduation Requirements for the MD Degree

Student Physician Activities (SPAs)

The EUSOM Curriculum Committee has stated the outcomes of the MD program in terms of the activities characteristic of a physician that students will learn and do.  These “Student Physician Activities” define what students should be able to perform prior to graduation.

  1. Take a patient-centered history (focused and complete)
  2. Perform a physical examination (focused and comprehensive) and recognize normal and abnormal findings
  3. Apply principles of medical science to interpret clinical information
  4. Apply principles of medical science to patient care to develop a problem list, working diagnosis, etiologic evaluation, and management plan
  5. Develop a patient care plan
  6. Perform technical procedures * (see Graduation Procedures List)
  7. Communicate with patients and their support system regarding their care
  8. Participate in difficult conversations with patients and their families
  9. Document patient findings and treatment plans
  10. Explain clinical decisions using scientific reasoning
  11. Use electronic medical records
  12. Formulate questions and search the literature to resolve knowledge gaps
  13. Contribute to generalizable medical knowledge
  14. Apply best evidence to the care of individual patients
  15. Recognize and address ethical dilemmas
  16. Protect patient information
  17. Fulfill the professional role of a physician
  18. Manage time
  19. Be a leader
  20. Use feedback to improve one's own practices
  21. Demonstrate trustworthiness to patients, colleagues, and other healthcare personnel
  22. Treat patients while understanding own biases
  23. Treat patients without regard to personal advantage
  24. Work in inter-professional teams
  25. Identify personal limitations and seek assistance as needed
  26. Teach peers and team members
  27. Serve the community
  28. Contribute to healthcare quality and safety initiatives

* Graduation Procedures List

Before graduation, all medical students should be able to:

  1. Adhere to universal precaution technique
  2. Maintain aseptic technique for invasive procedures
  3. Perform sterile gloving and gowning
  4. Perform a surgical hand scrub
  5. Perform basic suturing
  6. Administer local anesthesia
  7. Manage the airway [oropharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, or intubation]
  8. Conduct an initial emergency examinations, including assessment of the airway and hemodynamic stability
  9. Use a bag-mask
  10. Use an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED)
  11. Use a defibrillator
  12. Attain Basic Life Support certification
  13. Perform splint placement/fracture management
  14. Immobilize the cervical spine and perform a log roll
  15. Perform an abscess incision and drainage
  16. Perform an arterial puncture in the upper extremity
  17. Draw a venous blood sample
  18. Draw blood for bacterial cultures
  19. Place a peripheral IV line in the upper extremity
  20. Place a nasogastric tube
  21. Perform injections (Intradermal, intramuscular, & subcutaneous)
  22. Perform stool occult blood testing
  23. Perform a swab for throat culture
  24. Perform microscopic urinalysis
  25. Perform vaginal wet mount and KOH prep
  26. Obtain a cervical culture
  27. Perform a pap smear
  28. Perform a spontaneous vaginal delivery
  29. Place EKG leads
  30. Place a urinary catheter (female & male)
  31. Perform a surgical wound dressing change
  32. Provide broncho-inhaler instruction 
  33. Provide clean catch urine instruction for male and female 
  34. Use a handheld ultrasound machine including: probe selection, probe orientation, scanning technique.

Academic Requirements

The judgment of the faculty as to the fitness of a student for the MD degree is based not only upon scholastic achievement, but also upon knowledge of the student’s character, professionalism, general attitude, and abilities. Each student must be approved for graduation by the Dean and the School of Medicine Council of Chairs.

To be eligible to receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Emory University School of Medicine, students must:

  1. Have attained satisfactory standing in all courses and clerkships required for the degree;
  2. Have taken and successfully passed Steps 1, and 2 (Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills) of the USMLE;
  3. Have completed all academic requirements of the MD degree within no more than six academic years;
  4. Have met acceptable standards of professional behavior.

Financial Obligations

It is a requirement for graduation that all financial obligations to the University shall have been satisfied. In the case of outstanding loans not then due and payable, loan documents satisfactory to the University must have been executed and delivered, and all payments must be current.

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Section 9: Progress and Promotions

Promotional Guidelines

The medical school curriculum is inherently challenging. A student is considered to be achieving satisfactory academic progress as long as he or she is meeting the criteria for continual enrollment, as determined by the appropriate Progress and Promotions Committee. The assessment of academic progress includes the domains of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes.  Hence, professionalism is an integral component when considering academic progress. 

Independent of the final grade, unprofessional behavior may be the sole criterion for which a student may be recommended for academic warning, a period of academic probation, suspension, dismissal, or other appropriate sanctions as described throughout this document.

The designation of Academic Probation or suspension may result in the loss of federal financial aid. 

Guidelines for Performance in the Foundations Phase

Assuming the required level of professionalism has been met:

  1. A student qualifies for promotion with grades of “S” in the Healthy Human modules and in the Human Disease modules.
  1. Receiving an initial grade of “unsatisfactory” for one module, may result in a student being placed on academic warning and admonished to improve academic performance in the future. Remediation will be required for the module in question.
  1. Two or more initial grades of “unsatisfactory” in any semester during the Foundations Phase will result in an Academic Warning, at a minimum.  Remediation will be required for the modules in question. After review and evaluation of the student’s overall record, a student may (a) not be promoted, (b) be requested to repeat specific modules, or (c) be asked to repeat the Foundation Phase, or (d) be asked to withdraw from medical school.

A student may not be promoted with one or more final grades of “U”.  The Progress and Promotions Committee will review the entire record of any student who has a final grade of “U” in any subject to decide if remediation of the single “U” will be sufficient for promotion, or if the student should repeat any or all of the Foundations Phase, or if the student should be dismissed from medical school. 

No student may be promoted to the next academic phase while still holding a grade of “IP” or "I" in any course.

Guidelines for Performance in the Applications, Discovery and Translations Phases

As stated above, independent of final grades, unprofessional behavior may be the sole criterion for which a student may be recommended for a period of Academic Warning, a period of Academic Probation, suspension, dismissal, or other appropriate sanctions.  The following guidelines do not preclude the Progress and Promotion Committee from recommending repetition of courses, assignment of Academic Warning or Academic Probation, suspension or dismissal based on the Committee’s overall assessment of student performance, regardless of the specific grades.

  1. With one “D”, a student may be (a) withdrawn from medical school, or (b) allowed to continue on Academic Warning or Academic Probation and required to repeat the course in which the grade of "D" was earned, or (c) allowed to continue on Academic Warning or Academic Probation and required to repeat the entire year. Grades of “C” or better will be required in all course work thereafter.
  2. With more than one “D”, a student may be

    1. withdrawn from medical school, or
    2. allowed to continue on Academic Probation and required to repeat the courses in which the grade of “D” was earned, or
    3. allowed to continue on Academic Probation and required to repeat the entire year. Grades of “C” or better will be required in all course work thereafter.
    4. With a grade of “F” or “U” in any clinical education course, a student may either be dismissed or may be allowed to continue, after the course is successfully repeated.  Alternatively, the student may be required to repeat one or all of the Applications, Discovery, and Translations Phases of medical school.  If allowed to continue, the student will be placed on Academic Probation.  Grades of “C” or better will be required in all course work thereafter.
    5. Students required to repeat clerkships or courses will receive grades for both the initial and repeat attempts. Those grades will be recorded on the official transcript and remain a part of the student's permanent record. 
    6. Two grades of “F” call for dismissal. 

United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE)

The USMLE is an examination program with three steps, each complementary to the others. Students must successfully pass Step 1, Step 2 Clinical Knowledge, and Step 2 Clinical Skills in order to graduate from Emory University School of Medicine.

USMLE Step 1

In addition to successful academic and professional performance during the Foundation Phase, students must also earn a passing score on the Step 1 examination of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) prior to receiving permanent promotion to the Applications Phase of medical school. 

The following guidelines have been adopted regarding failure to pass the first administration of Step 1 of the USMLE, which will be taken by February 1st of their second year.

A student whose failing score is 15 points or less below the passing level has two options to gain promotion into the clinical years, provided that the student’s overall academic record warrants promotion. 

A student whose failing score is more than 15 points below the passing level is generally required to take a leave of absence to prepare for retaking the test the following year.  Such students may appeal to the Executive Associate Dean of OMESA and request an earlier re-take if extenuating circumstances are felt to exist.  On successful re-take, such a student enters the Applications Phase.

A student who fails USMLE Step 1 on the second administration will be given a third and final option to successfully complete Step 1 of the USMLE.  Dismissal from Emory University School of Medicine is mandatory after three unsuccessful attempts to pass Step 1 of the USMLE.

USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK)

Students are encouraged to take Step 2 CK as soon as feasible after the Applications Phase. At the latest however, students must take Step 2 CK by January 31st of the senior year. Passing Step 2 CK is a requirement for graduation.

USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS)

Students must take Step 2 CS by October 31st of the senior year. Passing Step 2 CS is a requirement for graduation.

Required Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)

Students are required to pass the “End of Foundations OSCE” before advancing to the Applications Phase, and to pass the “End of Applications OSCE” before advancing to any subsequent clinical phase of the curriculum. 

Progress and Promotions Committees

The Progress and Promotions Committees are chaired by faculty appointed by the Executive Associate Dean of Medical Education and Student Affairs (EAD) and are composed of the course, module, or clerkship directors in the curriculum of the year(s) involved and ex-officio members who do not have voting authority, appointed by the EAD.   Two committees exist: one for the Foundations Phase of the curriculum, and one for the Applications, Discovery, and Translations Phases of the curriculum.

At intervals throughout the school year, Progress and Promotions Committees discuss the progress of students in their classes.  If concerns regarding one or more students warrant, the EAD or Committee Chair may call special meetings of the appropriate committee to discuss those specific students. 

At the end of each academic period, the Progress and Promotion Committees for each class meet to review the performance of each student.  In the case of students experiencing difficulties in achieving satisfactory progress, the Progress and Promotions committee may interview the involved student(s) and any other faculty, staff, or students as appropriate. 

The Progress and Promotions Committee considers the totality of the student’s record and behavior since enrollment.  The committee is charged with making recommendations to the EAD as to whether students should be unconditionally promoted or whether promotion is to be permitted:

Personal illness and/or family tragedy directly affecting a student’s performance are given full consideration by the Progress and Promotions Committee and EAD before the conditional status of academic warning or probation is designated. 

An Academic Warning is an official warning given to a student whose performance is of concern.  Students given an academic warning receive written notice of their status from the EAD, noting the specific concern(s).   A copy of the letter is placed in the student’s file and made available to subsequent Progress and Promotion Committees during the student’s course of study.  

Academic Probation is a conditional status that may be designated by the EAD when a student’s performance is unsatisfactory.  The period of Academic Probation and the reasons for Probation, are given to the student in the form of a letter.  The letter is placed in the student’s file and made available to subsequent Progress and Promotions Committees.  Academic Probation is a serious reprobation, is indicated on the student’s transcript, and requires that a student maintain adequate performance for the period designated as the probationary period.     

For students who are not recommended for promotion, the Progress and Promotions Committee may recommend:

The Executive Associate Dean’s final decision is then provided to the student and a copy is placed in the student’s file. A student may appeal the decision of the Executive Associate Dean by submitting such request in writing to the Dean within ten (10) days of being notified of the decision by the Executive Associate Dean.

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Section 10: National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Examinations

The National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Examinations are an important part of the educational process, evaluating the performance of a large, representative group of examinees at the same stage of training.  These exams are used throughout the curriculum as one part of the evaluation process. Students are required to take NBME Subject Examinations at scheduled times and locations. 

Those students granted special accommodations for testing must present the Director of Medical Education & Student Affairs a letter from the Office of Disability Services each semester outlining the student’s specific accommodations. Individual arrangements will be made for the student at each exam in accordance with the letter.

To prevent additional charges, exam orders must be placed at least 22 days prior to the testing date. Therefore it is important for the Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs (OMESA) to know well in advance the number of students scheduled to test at every exam. Unexcused absences from NBME exams will result in the student being charged for any additional costs associated with rescheduling of the examination.

For NBME examinations, students MUST test within the normal testing schedule. A published exam schedule is available through the OMESA Welcome Center or the student portal.

To ensure the security of NBME materials and compliance with testing regulations, all NBME subject exams must be administered by trained proctors in an NBME-approved testing site. The School of Medicine Building is the only approved testing site for Emory medical students.

Arriving Late for an NBME Exam or Missing Examinations

It is considered part of professional behavior and the responsibility of the student to arrive on time for scheduled examinations with their Emory cards.

Emory designates a Chief Proctor for our NBME exams. It is the responsibility of the Chief Proctor and his or her designees to assure that NBME exams are given in strict accordance with NBME policy.  As per this policy, a student may be admitted to a testing room up to 30 minutes after the exam has started, provided the student’s name is on the check-in roster and the Chief Proctor approves the late start. Students arriving late for an exam will be expected to end the exam at the same time as other examinees; no extra time will be allotted to compensate for their tardiness.

For any student who is more than 30 minutes late for the exam, the NBME must be contacted by the Chief Proctor to seek approval for taking the examination.  The Chief Proctor and his or her designees are not required to allow any student to start an exam late if doing so will be excessively disruptive to the other students.

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Section 11: Honors

1. Academic honors

Academic honors are determined by a School of Medicine faculty committee. The designation of students graduating cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude are made on the basis of a combination of grade point average and other academic accomplishments, including Discovery and other academic pursuits, inclusive of work done as part of dual degree work or external fellowships.

2. Alpha Omega Alpha

Founded in 1902, Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society is a professional organization that recognizes and advocates for excellence in scholarship and the highest ideals in the profession of medicine.  Students are elected based on their embodiment of the vision and goals of the society:

a)     Professionalism: To hold the conviction that professionalism in medicine is a worthy goal.

b)     Scholarship: To promote scholarship among medical professionals.

c)      Leadership: To set an example worth emulating.

d)     Service: To serve the medical profession and the community.

Students who are in the upper quartile (25%) of their class in grade point average are eligible for nomination.  As outlined above, additional criteria include leadership capabilities, ethical standards, fairness in dealing with colleagues, demonstrated professionalism, and service to the school and community at large.  

One-sixth (16%) of a medical school graduation class may be considered for membership, and up to one-half of the total may be nominated during the junior year. New members are elected by the student members of Alpha Omega Alpha.  Elections occur during the spring of junior year and the fall of senior year.  For more information, please refer to http://www.alphaomegaalpha.org/ .

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Part III: Policies

Section 1: Emory University

University - Student Relations

The Board of Trustees of Emory University has adopted a Statement of Policy dealing with University-student relationships. Since application for admission is voluntary, students are free to withdraw at their pleasure, subject to compliance with the regulations of their school or college and to the fulfillment of their financial obligations to the University. Upon matriculation, each student agrees to be bound by the rules, policies, procedures, and administrative regulations as they exist at the time of his/her admission and as duly constituted authority may change them. Students have the opportunity to participate in the development of rules and procedures to the extent that such participation and its results are consistent with the orderly processes and with the responsibilities of the trustees and the administration. Rules of student organizations need not be uniform so long as they do not contravene any policy established by the Board of Trustees.

As an educational institution, Emory is not a vehicle for political or social action but does endorse the right of dissent and protects and encourages this right. The Board of Trustees and the president of the University have published a statement clarifying policy concerning abuse of this right. Each medical student should read this statement as contained in the Campus Life Handbook of the University.

To accomplish its objectives and responsibilities, the University must be free from violence, threats, and intimidation and must be dedicated to the rational approach to a resolution of human problems. In accordance with the By Laws of the University, the president of the University has delegated to the deans and faculties of each school primary responsibility for designing and implementing the school's educational program and whatever procedural guidelines and regulations may be deemed necessary to carry out the school's educational objectives appropriately. The dean of each school has the authority and responsibility for final judgment and action in all cases, provided that established procedures are followed.

Discretionary responsibility for handling extreme cases is retained by the president of the University. In particular situations, other offices or agents of the University must promulgate rules and regulations applicable to the area for which they are responsible (such as housing, University Health Service, food service, traffic and security, libraries, student organizations and activities, athletics, and other public events).

Rules and regulations contained herein conform to University policy but in some cases include specific requirements for students in the School of Medicine. The University Campus Life Handbook contains detailed listings of University policy and is distributed to all medical and allied health students annually who are accountable to its contents.

A detailed summary of State of Georgia and DeKalb County laws on alcohol, University regulations, and additional policies regarding alcohol may be obtained from the Campus Life Handbook and on the web at www.emory.edu/CAMPUS_LIFE/.

Statement of Policy

The Board of Trustees of Emory University has adopted a statement of policy dealing with University-student relationships, a digest of which follows.

  1. Emory University was founded on Christian principles by the Methodist Church and proudly continues its church relationship as an agency dedicated to seeking and imparting truth.
  2. Emory University admits qualified students of any sex, sexual orientation, race, religion, color, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status to all of the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at Emory University. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or veteran status in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic programs, and other Emory University-administered programs.
  3. Attendance at Emory University is a privilege and not a right. However, no student will be dismissed except in accordance with prescribed procedures. Students applying for admission do so voluntarily and are free to withdraw at their pleasure, subject to compliance with the regulations of their school or college governing withdrawal and to the fulfillment of their financial obligations to the University.
  4. Upon matriculation at Emory, each student agrees to be bound by the rules, policies, procedures, and administrative regulations as the regulations exist at the time of admission and as the regulations may be changed by duly constituted authority.
  5. By admission as a student at Emory University, a person acquires the right to pursue the course of study to which he or she is admitted, and to be treated with the dignity appropriate to an adult person in all matters relating to the University. In the same spirit, the student shall comply with the rules and regulations of Emory University.
  6. Students will be provided the opportunity to participate in the development of rules and procedures pertaining to University affairs to the extent that such participation and the results thereof, as determined by the Board of Trustees or its designated agent, are consistent with orderly processes and with the policies and administrative responsibilities of the Board of Trustees and the administration.
  7. The University expects students to conduct themselves with dignity, courtesy, responsibility, and integrity and with due respect for the rights of others, realizing that sobriety and morality are not only characteristics of a mature and responsible person but are essential to the maintenance of a free and orderly society.
  8. Membership in and rules governing admission to student organizations shall be determined by the organizations themselves, and such rules shall not be required to be uniform so long as these rules do not contravene any policy established by the Board of Trustees.

Emory University is an educational institution, not a vehicle for political or social action. It endorses the right of dissent and protects and encourages reasonable exercise of this right by individuals within the University. Because the right of dissent is subject to abuse, the Board of Trustees and the president have published a statement to clarify policy concerning such abuse, a digest of which follows.

Individuals associated with Emory represent a variety of viewpoints; the University fosters the free expression and interchange of differing views through oral and written discourse and logical persuasion.

Dissent, to be acceptable, must be orderly and peaceful and represent constructive alternatives reasonably presented.

Coercion, threats, demands, obscenity, vulgarity, obstructionism, and violence are not acceptable.

Demonstrations, marches, sit-ins, or noisy protests that are designed or intended to or do disrupt normal institutional pursuits will not be permitted.

Classes and routine operations will not be suspended except for reasonable cause as determined by the president.

Administrators, faculty, other employees, and students are expected to abide by these standards of conduct in promoting their views, particularly dissent.

Persons who are not so inclined should not become associated with Emory nor continue to be associated with Emory.

Academic and administrative procedures will protect individuals in their right of free expression and provide for prompt and appropriate action against those individuals who abuse such right.

Policy 8.8 Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy

Emory University is committed to the health and well-being of its faculty, staff, and student body. Alcohol and drug misuse and abuse can be detrimental to one’s overall physical and emotional health; academic and/or professional performance; and adversely impact family, friends and co-workers.

As a recipient of federal grants and contracts, Emory University adheres to the provisions of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989. As administrator of certain state-funded financial aid programs for students, Emory University also adheres to Georgia’s Drug-Free Postsecondary Education Act of 1990. 

This policy is also designed to convey the university’s care and concern for its members and their well-being, given that alcohol and other drug misuse on college campuses is a major public health concern. In order to foster academic achievement, personal success and wellness, and to promote the safety of the community, the university has adopted the following tenets to guide the prevention of alcohol and other drug misuse:

  • Emory University complies with and upholds all applicable federal, state, and local laws related to alcohol, illicit drugs and controlled substances. Violations of such laws that come to the attention of university officials may be addressed within the university or through prosecution in the courts, or both.
  • The university strives to create an environment that supports individuals who choose not to use alcohol and individuals who choose to use alcohol legally and in moderation. The illegal sale, distribution or use of alcohol is not permitted.
  • The university encourages individuals with prescription medications to safely and legally use such medications in compliance with their prescriptions. The misuse of prescription medication or other controlled substances is not tolerated.
  • The sale, distribution or use of illegal drugs is not permitted.
  • The university seeks to create an environment of personal development and supportive community. It supports individuals seeking services for alcohol, tobacco and/or other drug misuse and makes confidential services available to them.  
  • In instances where individuals are found to be in violation of the university’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy, the university’s response will stress individual accountability, personal development, and connection to appropriate health services, as well as the effect on impacted parties and the community.
  • Emory is a Tobacco-Free Campus. The use or sale of tobacco products in or on Emory owned or Emory leased property is prohibited. See Policy 4.113 Tobacco-Free Environment for more information (http://policies.emory.edu/4.113), including resources for tobacco cessation.

Applicability

All Emory University full-time, part-time and temporary faculty, staff, and students are hereby notified that this policy will apply to all activities conducted on university-owned property and to all other university-sponsored events.  This policy is distributed annually to all Emory University faculty, staff, and students.

Emory University permits the purchase and use of alcoholic beverages with university funds under certain conditions but expects individuals and organizations to take measures to prevent alcohol and drug misuse. The university expects that individuals and organizations will take responsibility for complying with the policy as outlined. This policy provides minimum expectations regarding alcohol and other drug prevention and services; individuals and organizations are encouraged to utilize best practices and to develop additional steps to support community safety. 

Specific offices have been designated to provide clarification about the procedures and guidelines for event planning, as well as services and resources available to faculty, staff and students for reducing at-risk behaviors related to alcohol and drug use.  The contact information for, and responsibility of, each of these offices is listed at the conclusion of this policy under “Contact Information.”

Prospective students that fail to comply with Georgia law and university policy can experience parental/guardian notification, the removal from campus, and may additionally compromise their consideration for admission to the university, in addition to possible law enforcement processes.

Policy Details

8.8.1.  Standards of Conduct

1.1.  All Emory University faculty, staff and students are prohibited by the University from unlawfully using, possessing, manufacturing, dispensing or distributing alcohol, controlled substances or illegal drugs on University-owned property or at University-sponsored activities.

1.2.   Emory University expects all of its faculty, staff and students to comply with any applicable federal, state or local laws pertaining to the use, possession, manufacture, dispensation or distribution of alcohol, controlled substances, or illegal drugs.

8.8.2.  General Georgia and DeKalb County Restrictions 

As of the effective date of the policy, THE FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY OF THE GEORGIA AND DEKALB COUNTY LAWS, ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS:

8.8.2.1.  Possession of Alcohol

Possession or use of alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age, or distribution of alcoholic beverages to persons under 21 years of age, is prohibited.

Furnishing alcoholic beverages to persons who are underage or intoxicated is prohibited.

The sale of alcoholic beverages without a license is prohibited. The sale of alcoholic beverages within 100 yards of a college campus in the State of Georgia is also prohibited, unless such license was in existence prior to July 1, 1981. “Sale” includes charging admission to any activity where alcoholic beverages are served, even if the beverage is “free” to those who have gained admission.

Public intoxication and possession of an open container of an alcoholic beverage in public are prohibited in the State of Georgia.

8.8.2.2.  Other Drugs

It is illegal and prohibited by the university for an individual to manufacture, possess, use, dispense, sell or distribute controlled substances or illegal drugs (as defined by state and federal law).  

8.8.2.3.  False Identification

It is illegal and prohibited by the university for an individual to provide false name, address or date of birth for the purpose of acquiring alcohol or other drugs. Members of the Emory community who allow their identification to be used by others to obtain alcohol or other drugs are also subject to disciplinary consequences.

8.8.3.  Sanctions and Penalties

8.8.3.1.   Any member of the Emory University faculty, staff or student body who violates any of the Standards of Conduct shall be subject to corrective disciplinary actions and penalties up to and including expulsion from university academic programs, termination of employment and referral to the appropriate federal, state or local authorities for prosecution in the courts.

Depending on the nature of the infraction, alleged violations of this policy by an individual student shall also be referred to the Office of Student Conduct, Student Health Services, other appropriate programs or the appropriate school’s conduct body. The Office of Student Conduct shall have the authority to make appropriate referrals and to impose on undergraduate students and student organizations such sanctions for violations of the policy as it may deem appropriate, including but not limited to participating in educational programs, parental notification and/or loss of privileges.

8.8.3.2.  Depending upon the nature of the crime, persons convicted of violating federal and state laws prohibiting the unlawful use, possession, dispensation, and distribution of alcohol, controlled substances, or illegal drugs may face stiff sanctions such as heavy fines; incarceration for various periods of time, including life; forfeiture of assets; or suspension or loss of driver’s, business or professional licenses. Federal, state and local officials are responsible for enforcing these laws and any sanctions for such crimes will be determined by courts. The university does not manage the criminal process but will cooperate with legal authorities in a manner consistent with its legal obligations.

8.8.3.3.  Section 484(r) of the Higher Education Act states that a federal or state drug conviction can disqualify a student for Federal Student Aid funds. As of the effective date of the policy, the period of ineligibility depends on whether the conviction was for sale or possession during a period of enrollment in which a student received federal student aid and whether the student had previous offenses, ranging from one year to an indefinite period of time. A student regains eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends, when he or she successfully completes a qualified drug rehabilitation program, when he or she successfully passes two unannounced drug tests conducted by a qualified drug rehabilitation program; or if a conviction is reversed, set aside or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record. 

Please see the Related Links section below for the Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties and Georgia Controlled Substance and Dangerous Drug Law charts for additional information.

8.8.4.   Notification of Drug-Related Convictions

As of the effective date of the policy, the following is a summary of the notification requirements upon a drug-related conviction:

8.8.4.2.  Student Notification of Drug-Related Convictions

In accordance with the State of Georgia’s Drug-Free Postsecondary Education Act of 1990, any student convicted under the laws of Georgia, the United States or any other state of any felony offense involving the manufacture, distribution, sale, possession or use of marijuana, a controlled substance, or a dangerous drug must, within ten (10) days of said conviction, report it in writing to the Emory University or Oxford College of Emory University Office of Financial Aid, as appropriate.  Any student who suffers such a conviction shall, as of the date of the conviction, be denied state of Georgia funds for certain types of loans, grants or scholarships, including Georgia Higher Education Loan Program loans, student incentive grants or tuition equalization grants.

As of the effective date of the policy, the denial of state funds shall become effective on the first day of the term for which the student was enrolled immediately following either the date of conviction or the date on which the court accepts a plea of nolo contendere or formally allows a student to receive first offender treatment. The denial of funds shall continue through the end of said term.

As per the School of Medicine Conduct Code, students must promptly report all arrests and criminal charges to the Executive Associate Dean.

8.8.5.  Advertisements and Promotions

8.8.5.1.  Advertisements and Promotion of Events

Publications of any type and in any media, including The Wheel and other newspapers, pamphlets, flyers, websites, etc., that receive some or all of their funding from university sources (including the Student Activity Fee) must not accept or contain commercial advertising or other materials that promotes, depicts or encourages excessive or underage consumption or use, or underage purchase, of alcoholic beverages or controlled substances.

Depictions of the following may not be used in advertisements or in the promotion of events:

  • Excessive or underage consumption or use, or underage purchase, of alcoholic beverages or controlled substances
  • All-you-can-drink activities
  • Drinking games
  • Price specials on alcohol
  • Promotions or prizes featuring alcohol

This list is not exhaustive; it is meant to provide examples of the types of activities that are considered by the University as promoting excessive alcohol consumption. It is also not intended to cover alcohol consumption related to content of curriculum, research objectives or alumni events.

8.8.5.2.  Use of Name, Logo, Seal, Insignia or Mascot

Neither the University’s name, the names of its organizations, nor its logos, mascots, marks or other identifying indicia may be used in conjunction with any materials, references or imagery, including commercial sponsorship, related to excessive or underage consumption or use, or underage purchase of alcoholic beverages or controlled substances.

8.8.6.  Purchasing Alcohol with University and Student Activity Fee Funds

Alcoholic beverages may not be purchased with any state or federal appropriated funds. For more information, contact the Office of Grants and Contracts Accounting.

Schools, colleges, departments, or units determine the permissibility of charging alcoholic beverages to university accounts. In addition Purchasing Cards (“P-cards”) are not to be used to purchase alcoholic beverages unless there is a special exception. For more information, contact the head of the specific unit or department.

Student organizations that are recognized by the Student Government Association (“Student Organization”) and fraternities and sororities recognized by the Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life (“Fraternities”) must obtain approval from the Office of Student Leadership and Service or the Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life, as applicable, for the purchase of any alcoholic beverage. 

The use of alcoholic beverages purchased with university and student activity funds as a prize in any type of contest is prohibited.

8.8.7.  Storage of Alcohol

Any alcohol that is stored on campus must be kept in a place where it is not accessible to those under twenty-one years of age.

8.8.8.   Use of Alcohol in Residence Halls

Activities that take place within university Residence Halls are governed by applicable laws and regulations, the terms of the Residence Life Policy for Undergraduate Students, the Undergraduate Housing Agreement, and the Undergraduate Code of Conduct.  A Campus Life online registration form is applicable whenever the service of alcoholic beverages takes place within any university community space.

Residents under the age of 21:

  • Are not permitted to be in possession of, consume or store alcohol in any residence halls, consistent with state law.

Residents age 21 and over:

  • Are permitted to be in possession of, consume or store alcohol in any residence halls, consistent with state law, with the exception of those at Oxford College. Possessing, consuming and/or storing alcohol is prohibited in all residence halls at Oxford College.

In Residence Halls:

  • Alcohol is not allowed in community spaces (such as lobbies, lounges, study rooms, or hallways) without prior approval from Residence Life and Housing, with the exception of organizations that fall under the Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life. Fraternities and sororities are required to follow regulations from the Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life (OSFL) and from their respective national organizations. Other individuals or groups who wish to serve alcohol in community spaces of residence halls should complete the Campus Life online registration form.
  • Common containers (such as kegs and punch bowls) are not permitted in residence halls or food service areas of residence halls.
  • Activities (e.g. drinking games) and paraphernalia (i.e. funnels, beer pong tables, and ice slides) that promote the rapid and unsafe consumption of alcohol are also prohibited within residence halls and contiguous areas.
  • Brewing or production of alcohol beverages is prohibited.

Residents of university residence halls are required to inform all guests of the aforementioned regulations and to make sure their guests abide by all provisions of this policy. In cases where the guest of a resident violates this policy, the hosting resident will be subject to disciplinary consequences.

8.8.9.  Use of Alcohol at Athletic Events

Alcoholic beverages may not be possessed, consumed or served at university intramural and club sports contests or intercollegiate athletic contests, but may be allowed at adjacent events. Interpretation of “adjacent events” will be under the authority of the Director of Athletics or his/her staff, as appropriate.

The possession, consumption and purchase of alcoholic beverages, tobacco and/or illegal drugs by any student-athlete or manager is prohibited while participating in an intercollegiate, club, intramural or recreational athletics activity. In the case of road trips, no alcoholic beverages, tobacco or illegal drugs are to be purchased by or possessed by any team member from the time the team leaves campus until the time the team returns to campus. 

Student-athletes should refer to Emory’s Student-Athlete handbook for information regarding NCAA banned substances. They can also contact their team physician or certified athletic trainer with any questions.

Emory Athletics Overnight Program

Emory host students that fail to comply with Georgia law and university policy prohibiting individuals under the age of 21 to consume or possess alcohol and/or Georgia law and university policy prohibiting any person from furnishing alcohol to a person under the age of 21 or to someone who is intoxicated can be subject to Campus Life disciplinary consequences and/or law enforcement processes.

8.8.10.   Procedures for Events with Alcohol

The following procedures apply to all university-sponsored events where alcohol will be served. University-sponsored events are defined as an event hosted by a student organization or by an official department or division of the university. University-sponsored events include, but are not limited to, any internal or external sponsored events held on campus; fraternity and sorority events; campus organization events; and divisional and departmental or unit events. The following procedures are provided to assist with the planning of events; however, the service of alcoholic beverages is permitted only in accordance with this policy and applicable local laws.

8.8.10.1.  On-Campus Events with Alcohol

Student Organization Events

All Student Organizations must complete the online registration form for student organizations.

The following management strategies must be in place in order for alcohol service to be permitted:

  • The president or risk manager of the Student Organization must attend a Campus Life sponsored training session that includes content about hosting events with alcohol;
  • Alcohol acquired with university funds, including kegs of beer, is allowed only if a licensed caterer or trained non-student server serves the alcohol;
  • EmoryCard readers or another verification plan approved by Campus Life must be used to verify each individual’s age.
  • Student organizations are also responsible for complying with any applicable regulations from their national organizations; and
  • Under no circumstances is the alcohol to be left unattended.

Sorority and Fraternity Events

Sororities and fraternities are expected to follow all of the above policies for student organization events with alcohol. Sorority and fraternity events where alcohol is served (including guest list parties, date parties and mixers) are required to follow additional regulations from the Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life (OSFL) and from their respective national organizations.

  • The organizer for each social event must complete the online registration form for fraternity and sorority social events; and
  • Presidents, risk managers, and social chairs must attend an OSFL-sponsored training that includes content about hosting events with alcohol service. (This training fulfills the requirement of the Campus-Life sponsored training outlined above.)

Other University Events

For University events in which attendance is expected by undergraduate students, alcohol acquired with university funds, including kegs of beer, is allowed only if a licensed caterer or trained non-student server serves the alcohol, and under no circumstances is the alcohol left unattended.

EmoryCard readers or another verification plan approved by Campus Life must be used to verify each individual’s age.

The following individuals or groups wishing to serve alcoholic beverages at any event that takes place on campus (excluding events at the Emory Conference Center, the Houston Mill House, or the Miller Ward Alumni House) must complete the online registration form for university departments:

  1. Any individual acting in a capacity other than on behalf of an academic or administrative department (this applies to both members and non-members of the university community);
  2. Anyone planning an open (public) event, (including those individuals acting on behalf of an academic or administrative department);
  3. Anyone planning an event for which individuals under twenty-one (21) years of age are expected to attend (including those individuals acting on behalf of an academic or administrative department).

The completed online registration form will be forwarded to Meeting Services Office. The Meeting Services staff will send it to the building manager of the venue at which the event is being held.

8.8.10.2.  Additional Food and Beverages

All events where alcohol is served must have sufficient quantities of non-alcoholic beverages and substantial food offerings available at all times during the event.

8.8.10.3.  Off-Campus Events 

An individual planning an off-campus event with alcohol on behalf of a department or unit, e.g. departmental party, must notify the head of the department or unit. In addition, student–government and other chartered groups must notify their faculty/staff advisor.

Hiring an insured and licensed caterer to control the service of alcohol is recommended, unless such service is provided by the venue, and requiring the caterer or venue, as applicable, to provide liquor liability insurance is also recommended. The owner of the event space assumes all liability for the event. Additional procedures or guidelines may be required by individual university departments or units. Organizations or event sponsors should check with the particular department or sponsor to make sure all requirements are understood.   

8.8.11.  Additional Information

8.8.11.1  Resources for Education, Consultation and Counseling

The university sponsors several programs that provide information and professional services for its faculty, staff and students on matters related to the misuse and abuse of alcohol and drugs. These programs provide education, consultation, assessment, counseling and referral in a professional environment that respects individual confidentiality and integrity. The university maintains the Faculty Staff Assistance Program (FSAP) (404.727.4328) for faculty and staff; and the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) (404.727.7450) and the Office of Health Promotion (404.727.7551) for students. Augmenting these formal programs, a variety of other campus programs and services educate and assist individuals who take the initiative to help themselves. Please see Related Links for additional information on these services.

Common to all of these programs is the ethic that personal responsibility and professional guidance are keys to success. Therefore, the university expects its faculty, staff, and students to take measures to prevent alcohol and drug misuse and abuse in the community. The university also encourages its members to seek assistance from the above programs if they think that they may have a problem with alcohol or drug use.

8.8.11.2.  Distribution

This policy and any revisions thereto, shall be distributed to all faculty, staff, and students annually. Other applicable policies that have reference to this policy are found in the Campus Life Handbook, the Faculty Handbook, the Staff Handbook, the Human Resources Handbook and Policies and Procedures Manual, the Undergraduate Code of Conduct, and the Doctor of Medical Student Handbook.

8.8.11.3.  Additional Policies Regarding Alcohol

All student organizations chartered by the Student Government Association are under the jurisdiction of the Student Government Association and its policies and procedures and the policies and procedures of the Office of Student Leadership and Service.

Fraternities and sororities must comply with their respective national organizations’ alcohol policies, the Interfraternity Council (IFC) and Intersorority Council (ISC) policies, and the policies of the Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life (OSFL).

Residence Hall events must comply with Residence Life and Housing policies.

Students at Oxford College must comply with the Oxford College Alcohol Policy.             

Miller Ward Alumni House events must comply with the Miller Ward Alumni House Alcohol Policy.

Additional policies are linked to below.

8.8.11.4.  Review

A biennial review of this policy shall be conducted by a committee appointed by the president that shall include representatives from the following offices, programs, divisions and departments: Office of the President, Office of the Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Office of Research Compliance, Faculty Staff Assistance Program, Human Resources Division, Division of Campus Life, Office of Financial Aid, Emory Police Department, Office of the Provost, and Office of the Vice President for Health Affairs, as well as one or more student representatives. In addition, in accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act, the review shall include the number of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur on campus or as part of the university’s activities and are reported to campus officials, as well as the number and type of sanctions imposed as a result of such drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities, that occur on campus or as part of the university’s activities. 

Deans and directors of all schools, departments, and divisions will review and interpret policies and procedures. 

Definitions

University Residence Hallsincludes university-owned residential facilities such as halls, fraternity and sorority housing, theme houses, and apartments.

University-Sponsored Event—is an event hosted by a student organization or by an official department or division of the university. University-sponsored events include, but are not limited to, any internal or external sponsored events held on campus; fraternity and sorority events; campus organization, divisional, departmental or unit events. 

University-Sponsored Organization – A student organization that

  1. is registered with the university;
  2. is affiliated with a university department or unit that acknowledges the organization as part of its activities; or
  3. sponsors activities that relate to the education, research and community service missions of the university or to the goals or objectives of the department or unit of affiliation.

Related Links

Current Version of This Policy (http://policies.emory.edu/8.8)

CAPS Counseling and Psychological Services (http://studenthealth.emory.edu/cs/)

Athletics Department (http://www.emoryathletics.com/landing/index)

Faculty Staff Assistance Program (http://www.fsap.emory.edu/)

Center for International Programs Abroad (http://www.cipa.emory.edu/index.html)

EmoryCard Office: Request for EmoryCard Service (http://studentfinancials.emory.edu/pdf/Request_for_EmoryCard_Services-Revised_Ver_8_02_2012.pdf)

Medical Amnesty Protocol (http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hp/alcohol_and_other_drugs/medical_amnesty.html)

Miller-Ward Alumni House Policy (http://www.alumni.emory.edu/images/benefits-images/miller-ward-assets/mwah-policies.pdf)

Office of Graduate Medical Education Drug-Free Workplace Policy (http://www.med.emory.edu/gme/housestaff/housestaff_policies/section24.html)

Office of Health Promotion (http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hp/)

Residence Life and Housing (http://www.emory.edu/HOUSING/SELECTION/policy.html)

Office of Student Conduct (http://conduct.emory.edu/))

Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life (http://osfl.emory.edu/)

Office of Sorority and Fraternity Life social even registration form (http://www.emory.edu/CAMPUS_LIFE/alcohol_registration/index.html)

Registration forms for on campus events with alcohol, for student organizations, for fraternity and sorority social events, for university departments (http://www.emory.edu/CAMPUS_LIFE/alcohol_registration/index.html)

Office of Student Leadership and Service and SGA Organization Policies (Eagle Source) (http://www.osls.emory.edu/student_orgs/eagle_source/)

Student Government Association (http://students.emory.edu/SGA/)

Oxford College Office of Student Conduct (http://www.oxford.emory.edu/life-at-

oxford/student-conduct/)

Purchasing Card Policy and Procedures (http://policies.emory.edu/2.23)

Student Health Services (http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hs/)

Federal Trafficking Penalties (http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ftp3.shtml)

Georgia Controlled Substance and Dangerous Drug Laws Chart (http://tinyurl.com/26pfhy)

Drugs of Abuse: Uses and Effects (http://tinyurl.com/2gcprg)

Substance Abuse/Drug-Free Workplace (http://policies.emory.edu/4.66)

Tobacco Free Environment Policy 4.113 (https://policies.emory.edu/4.113)

http://policies.emory.edu/8.8

Policy 3.1 Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment

Overview

EMORY UNIVERSITY NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT  

Emory University is an inquiry-driven, ethically engaged, and diverse community dedicated to the ideals of free academic discourse in teaching, scholarship, and community service. Emory University abides by the values of academic freedom and is built on the assumption that contention among different views is positive and necessary for the expansion of knowledge, both for the University itself and as a training ground for society at large. Emory is committed to the widest possible scope for the free circulation of ideas. 

The University is committed to maintaining an environment that is free of unlawful harassment and discrimination. Pursuant to the University’s commitment to a fair and open campus environment and in accordance with federal law, Emory cannot and will not tolerate discrimination against or harassment of any individual or group based upon race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor that is a prohibited consideration under applicable law. Emory University welcomes and promotes an open and genuinely diverse environment. 

This policy is a republishing of the Emory University Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy, which previously was published at: http://www.emory.edu/EEO/equalopportunitydiscriminatoryharassment.htm

This policy also supersedes and retires Policy 8.6, Grievance Procedures – Employee and Student Complaints of Discrimination, and unifies the grievance process.  The effective date represents only the date that this version was published on policies.emory.edu and does not reflect the original effective date of this policy.

Applicability of Policy

This Policy shall apply to persons who are employees and students of Emory University, vendors, contractors, guests, patrons, and other third parties participating in any Emory-sponsored event or program, whether on or off campus, and to such persons in other situations in which the respondent is acting as a member of the Emory community. 

Complaints against Students

Students are bound by the principles outlined in this policy. However, complaints against students (when acting in the capacity as a student) shall be resolved under the Conduct Code provided by that student’s school or college unless the student’s school or college conduct code provides otherwise.  Investigation of complaints against students who are acting in the capacity of an employee shall be conducted by the Director of Equal Opportunity Programs and/or the Title IX Coordinator, or his or her designee, who shall report his or her findings and recommendations to the Senior Vice President and Dean for Campus Life and the Dean of the school or college in which the student is enrolled.

Sexual Harassment Complaints Against Students

Sexual Misconduct is a form of gender discrimination prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Title IX specifically prohibits sexual harassment and sexual misconduct in the educational setting. Emory University has adopted a separate Sexual Misconduct Policy, University Policy 8.2, that applies to student-on-student allegations, or allegations in which the respondent is a student.  Policy 8.2 explains how to report allegations of sexual misconduct, and sets forth detailed procedures designed to provide a fair process for parties when students are involved in allegations of sexual misconduct.  

Policy Details

1.3.1. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY

Emory University is dedicated to providing equal opportunities to all individuals regardless of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, and veteran’s status. Emory University does not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment on the basis of any factor stated above or prohibited under applicable law.  Students, faculty, and staff are assured of participation in University programs and in the use of facilities without such discrimination.  Emory University complies with all applicable equal employment opportunity laws and regulations, and follows the principles outlined above in all aspects of employment including recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline, terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, and training. 

1.3.2. DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT POLICY

In keeping with its commitment to maintaining an environment that is free of unlawful discrimination and with its legal obligations, Emory maintains a policy prohibiting unlawful harassment.  Discriminatory harassment of any kind, whether it is sexual harassment or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor that is a prohibited consideration under applicable law, by any member of the faculty, staff, administration, student body, a vendor, a contractor, guest or patron on campus, is prohibited at Emory. 

At the same time, Emory recognizes the centrality of academic freedom and the University’s determination to protect the full and frank discussion of ideas.  (See Policy 8.14.) Thus, discriminatory harassment does not refer to the use of materials for scholarly purposes appropriate to the academic context, such as class discussions, academic conferences, or meetings. Additionally, discriminatory harassment does not refer to participation in lawful protests, public forums, or campus publications established for the purpose of freely expressing opinions or ideas in the university community. 

A. Discriminatory Harassment of a Sexual Nature 

Sexual harassment includes unwelcome conduct, based on sex or on gender stereotypes, when;

  1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or student status or;
  2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual or;
  3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with a person’s university employment, academic performance or participation in university programs or activities, or creates a working, learning, program or activity environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating, hostile or offensive.

Sexual harassment may include, for example, repeatedly subjecting a person to egregious, unwelcome sexual attention, physical or verbal advances, sexual flirtations or propositions, vulgar talk or jokes, degrading graphic materials or verbal comments of a sexual nature about an individual or his or her appearance, or the display of sexually suggestive objects outside a scholarly context and purpose. 

Sexual harassment includes sexual misconduct, sexual violence, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking, and gender-based bullying.  Prohibited sexual harassment in the working or learning environment includes an attempt to coerce an unwilling person into a sexual relationship; to punish a refusal to comply with a sexual based request; to condition a benefit on submitting to sexual advances, and to make direct or implied threats that submission to sexual advances will be a condition of employment or academic opportunity. Sexual harassment may also occur in the form of unwelcome, sexually suggestive cartoons, pictures, email, text, tweets, video or other graphic materials that may contribute to a hostile working or learning environment.

B. Discriminatory Harassment of a Non-Sexual Nature

Emory’s policy prohibits discriminatory harassment of a non-sexual nature, which includes verbal, physical, or graphic conduct that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual or group on the basis of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor that is a prohibited consideration under applicable law, and that 

  • Has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive employment, educational, or living environment; or
  • Has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or a student’s academic performance.

Prohibited behavior includes conduct or material (physical, oral, written, graphic, , electronic messages or media posted or circulated in the community) involving epithets, slurs, negative stereotyping, threatening, intimidating, or hostile acts, that serve no scholarly purpose appropriate to the academic context and gratuitously denigrates or shows hostility or aversion toward an individual or group because of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor protected by applicable law.

C. Reporting to Office of Equal Opportunity Programs

Emory encourages anyone who has knowledge of discrimination on campus to report alleged violations of this policy. Because discriminatory harassment interferes with the University’s educational mission and may be unlawful, anyone who becomes aware of discrimination or discriminatory harassment committed by member of the faculty, staff, administration, student body, a vendor, a contractor, guest or patron on campus, is encouraged to report the harassment to the Director of Equal Opportunity Programs.  The Director of Equal Opportunity Programs is also the University Title IX Coordinator.   

Emory faculty, administrators and supervisors are required to immediately report any employment complaints they receive or incidents of discrimination or discriminatory harassment they witness, to their immediate report or to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs.

University Title IX Coordinator/Equal Opportunity Office:

Danielle Dempsey-Swopes

Director, Equal Opportunity Programs and Title IX Coordinator

201 Dowman Drive

Administration Bldg Ste 305

Atlanta, GA 30322
MS: 1000-001-1AX

(404) 727-9867

(404) 712-9108 fax

ddempsey-swopes@emory.edu

D. Prohibition Against Retaliation

Retaliation against an individual who, in good faith, complains about or participates in an investigation or a hearing relating to an allegation of discrimination or harassment is prohibited.  Any individual who feels retaliated against, or has been threatened with retaliation, should report that allegation immediately to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs (EOP).

E. False Accusations

Anyone who knowingly makes a false or bad faith accusation of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation will be subject to appropriate sanctions. However, failure to prove a claim of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation does not, in and of itself, constitute proof of a knowingly false accusation.

1.3.3. INVESTIGATION AND RESOLUTION PROCESSES

Individuals who believe that they have experienced or have information about acts of discrimination or discriminatory harassment may seek resolution through one of the methods discussed below.  The University’s response to the alleged discrimination will depend upon the severity and pervasiveness of the alleged conduct, which may be determined by the existence of prior incidents of harassment or discrimination. Depending upon the severity of the offense, however, a single violation of this Policy may be sufficient to support a violation. 

The university will take seriously every allegation or report of discrimination or harassment received. Emory University’s response is intended to ensure that all parties involved receive fair treatment, and that allegations are handled in a prompt, thorough and equitable manner.

A. Direct Communication with the Alleged Harasser 

If the aggrieved person feels comfortable speaking directly with the alleged offending person to address concerns and obtain an appropriate resolution, he or she is encouraged to do so. While this method of resolution may be successful in solving the immediate problem, unless information is provided through the reporting channels covered in this policy, Emory may remain unaware of the issue and be unable to take any additional steps that might be necessary to address broader concerns. Individuals who choose not to address the alleged harasser directly, or who have not obtained a satisfactory resolution following such a discussion, are encouraged to utilize one of the other methods outlined below for addressing their concerns. 

B. Assistance of a Community Facilitator

An individual also has the option to pursue informal investigation, clarification and mediation through a Community Facilitator. To facilitate early resolution of alleged discrimination or harassment, and to encourage engagement by individuals familiar with the context of the complaint, the Community Facilitator will be chosen by the aggrieved individual from a pool of Community Facilitators. The Provost or his or her designee, in consultation with Deans, Department/Program chairs, division heads, and the President of the University Senate, will select the members of the pool from across the University. There shall be 15 to 20 Community Facilitators in the pool, at least one member from each school or business unit within Emory. They shall serve three year terms, with approximately one third of the members rotating out of the pool each year. 

To ensure a high quality of peer support across units, all Community Facilitators will undergo training on dispute resolution and issues related to harassment and discrimination. As mechanisms for informal dispute resolution, the Community Facilitators do not have the right to sanction or punish, but rather to discuss the alleged conduct with the alleged harasser, to act as a mediator, and, if warranted, to seek a commitment from the alleged harasser to comply with this Policy. If, in the opinion of the Community Facilitators, all good faith efforts to resolve the situation have been exhausted, the Community Facilitator may end the process and refer the matter to EOP. 

As members of the University community, Community Facilitators have the obligation to report all allegations of discrimination or harassment to EOP and the Provost or the Provost’s designee. Such reporting will allow Emory University to monitor and react to trends related to allegations of discrimination and harassment, and to recommend further action, if necessary.

If at any point in this process, the aggrieved individual determines that this method of resolution is unsatisfactory, he or she has every right to file an internal complaint with EOP or an external complaint with EEOC. The accused individual also has the right to refuse to participate in the Community Facilitator process.

C.  Filing an internal complaint with the Emory University Equal Opportunity Office  

If a member of the Emory University Community believes that he or she has been the victim of discrimination or discriminatory harassment or has information about discrimination/harassment in the university community, he or she may promptly report, without fear of reprisal, the facts of the incident and the name(s) of the individual(s) involved to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, located in Suite 305 of the Administration Building, or call Equal Opportunity Programs at (404) 727-9867. This report initiates a complaint. 

Alternatively, a member of the university community may report the situation to his or her immediate supervisor, department head, or Dean, who will immediately notify EOP of the report. This report initiates a complaint. Supervisors must immediately report any complaints they receive or incidents of alleged harassment or discrimination they witness to the Equal Opportunity Programs. However, if the complaint relates to a member of Equal Opportunity Programs, the complaint should be directed to the Supervisor of the Director of Equal Opportunity Programs, who shall appoint an appropriate investigator.

The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs (or an alternate investigator, where appropriate) will promptly, fairly and thoroughly investigate all timely claims of harassment and discrimination, regardless of whether such complaints are reduced to writing. All complaints of discrimination and harassment will be treated in the strictest confidence possible under the particular circumstances. 

All complaints of discrimination or harassment should be filed as soon after the alleged offending conduct as possible, but in no event more than 180 calendar days after the most recent conduct alleged to constitute discrimination or harassment.

Emory will not retaliate or take any adverse action against anyone for truthfully reporting conduct that he or she believes to be in violation of this Policy, or for participating in good faith in an investigation of alleged discrimination or harassment, or for participating in any proceeding or hearing relating to such complaints. 

Upon receipt of a complaint, the Director of Equal Opportunity Programs (or an appropriate alternate investigator) will assign an investigator who will, within thirty calendar days, investigate the circumstances of the allegations. However, if additional time is needed to conduct a thorough investigation, EOP may, in its discretion, extend the time for completing the investigation as reasonably necessary. In this case, EOP will notify the complainant and the respondent of the extension. 

The investigation will include interviews with the complaining party, the respondent, and any material witnesses identified, as well as a review of any documents or other evidence. The complaining party and the respondent will be kept apprised of the conduct of the investigation and will be given the opportunity to provide any additional relevant information to the investigator, including the names of additional witnesses to contact and/or additional documents to review before the investigation is closed. At any time before the conclusion of the investigation, the Dean or equivalent division head of the unit of the University to which the respondent is assigned may take interim emergency action (not involving reduction of compensation) until the conclusion of the investigation. 

The final written determination will state only whether, based on EOP’s investigation, there was a violation of this Policy. The complainant and respondent will be promptly notified of the final determination.  The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall have no independent authority to impose sanctions. 

If EOP finds that there has been a violation of this policy and if the Dean or division head seeks advice as to the appropriate penalty, EOP may provide a recommendation as to the appropriate sanction. The Dean or division head will then be responsible for deciding upon and imposing disciplinary action as soon as reasonably possible, but within no more than one month after receiving the final determination and advice of EOP. The Dean or deciding official shall notify EOP of the penalty imposed, if any.

Sanctions imposed on those individuals who have been found to be in violation of the University’s Equal Opportunity Policy or its Discriminatory Harassment Policy shall be commensurate with the severity and/or frequency of the conduct, and shall be adequate and sufficient to prevent such conduct in the future. The sanctions may include, but are not limited to, an apology to the victim; a verbal or written reprimand; a requirement to attend remedial training; appropriate workplace restrictions; denial of a merit pay increase or other benefit; denial of promotion; or reassignment, suspension or separation from the University.  Staff members who receive disciplinary penalties under this policy may consult Human Resources for information about the Grievance process, which may be used to challenge alleged violations, misinterpretations, or inequitable application of policies or procedures.

D. Issues Specific to Faculty

If at any time during the investigation, a bona fide question arises out of a conflict between the principles of academic freedom and the requirements of this Policy, the respondent or Director of Equal Opportunity Programs may request that the Provost or his/her designee appoint a Faculty Review Panel to review the evidence and to provide advice to the EOP as to whether there was a violation of Policy. If the Provost agrees that the situation involves a bona fide conflict between the principles of academic freedom and the requirements of this Policy, the Provost shall appoint a Faculty Review Panel. The convening, investigation and recommendation of the Faculty Review Panel will be concurrent with the investigation of EOP. The Faculty Review Panel will consist of a group of 5 to 7 faculty members, 3 of whom are from the respondent’s school, who will be chosen by the Provost from among a pool of eligible faculty members who are elected by University faculty. Once selected by the Provost, the Faculty Review Panel may question the respondent, the complainant, and any other witness necessary to adequately address the issue. The Faculty Review Panel may also review the EOP investigatory file and any other documentary evidence needed. The procedures shall be kept as confidential as possible so as to respect the rights of all involved parties. At the conclusion of its review, the Faculty Review Panel shall provide a recommendation to EOP as to whether it believes that there was a violation of the Discriminatory Harassment Policy. EOP shall include the recommendation of the Faculty Review Panel in submitting the final report to the Dean. The Dean shall make the final decision as to what, if any, sanctions may be appropriate under the circumstances.  

Following a determination of sanctions, faculty may avail themselves of avenues of appeal as listed in the Statement of Principles Governing Faculty Relationships. Specifically, a faculty member shall be entitled to a hearing of the Faculty Hearing Committee when the sanction imposed by the Dean for violation of this Policy is the suspension, transfer, or termination of his/her employment.

E. Filing an External Complaint

An individual who believes that he or she has been subjected to unlawful discrimination, harassment, or retaliation has the right to file a complaint with an appropriate local, state, or federal agency, such as the Department of Education Office of Civil Rights (OCR) http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html or the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) http://www.eeoc.gov/, within applicable time limits. In addition, any person who is dissatisfied with Emory’s internal procedures utilized for handling complaints, or who is dissatisfied with the result of the investigation or the sanctions imposed, may seek redress through the EEOC, to the extent allowed by law. The complainant should be aware that filing a complaint with the University’s Office of Equal Opportunity Programs or other University resource does not extend or postpone the deadline for filing with external agencies. In the event that a complaint is filed with an external agency or court, the University reserves the right to determine, in its discretion, whether the University’s internal complaint resolution procedure should be discontinued or continued separately. 

1.3.4.  COMPLAINTS AGAINST VENDORS, CONTRACTORS AND THIRD PARTIES

Emory’s commitment to providing members of its community with a working and learning environment that is free of discriminatory harassment includes freedom from inappropriate conduct by vendors, contractors, and third parties. If a member of the University community believes he or she has been subjected to harassing conduct by a vendor, contractor, or third party, he or she should report such conduct to the Office of Equal Opportunity programs, to his or her immediate supervisor or Dean, or to a higher University official. Such complaints should be forwarded to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs immediately. EOP will work with the complaining party to investigate the complaint, and the University will take prompt corrective action if inappropriate conduct is found to have occurred. 

1.3.5 DEFINITIONS

Allegation. A statement by a complainant that an act of harassment or discrimination has occurred.

Coercion. Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure someone uses to get consent from another. When a person makes clear that the person does not want sex, wants to stop, or that going past a certain point of sexual interaction is unwanted, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive.

Complainant. The person making an allegation or complaint of discrimination. 

Complaint. A formal notification, either orally or in writing, of the belief that discrimination or violation of this Policy has occurred.

Consent. Consent is clear, unambiguous, and voluntary agreement between participants to engage in specific sexual activity. Consent is active, not passive, and is given by clear actions or words. Consent may not be inferred from silence, passivity, or lack of active resistance alone. A current or previous dating or sexual relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent, and consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Being intoxicated does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent. In some situations, an individual may be deemed incapable of consenting to sexual activity because of circumstances or the behavior of another, or due to their age.  Examples of such situations include, but are not limited to, incompetence, impairment from alcohol and/or other drugs, fear, unconsciousness, intimidation, coercion, confinement, isolation, or mental or physical impairment.

Force. The use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats) and coercion that overcomes resistance or produces consent. There is no requirement that a person has to resist the sexual advance or request, but resistance is a clear demonstration of non-consent. The presence of force is not demonstrated by the absence of resistance. Sexual activity that is forced is by definition non-consensual, but non-consensual sexual activity is not by definition forced.

Incapacitation. Incapacity can result from mental disability, sleep, involuntary physical restraint, or from intentional or unintentional taking of alcohol and or other drugs. An incapacitated person does not have the ability to give knowing consent. Sexual activity with a person who one should know to be – or based on the circumstances should reasonably have known to be – mentally or physically incapacitated, constitutes a violation of this policy. The perspective of a reasonable person will be the basis for determining whether one should have known about the impact of the use of alcohol and/or drugs on another’s ability to give consent.

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples, whether cohabitating or not, and does not require sexual intimacy. IPV can vary in frequency and severity, can occur on a continuum, and can include acts of physical violence, sexual violence, threats of physical or sexual violence, or psychological or emotional violence. Psychological or emotional violence is a broad term that results in trauma to a victim caused by acts, threats of acts, or coercive tactics, and can include acts of humiliation, intimidation, isolation, stalking, and harassment. 

Non-Consensual Sexual Contact. Any intentional sexual touching by a person upon a person, that is without consent and/or by force. This includes, but is not limited to, intentional contact with the breasts, buttocks, groin, or genitals, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another touch oneself or themselves with or on any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, though not involving contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice, with any object.

Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse. Any sexual intercourse, however slight, by a person upon a person, that is without consent and/or by force. Intercourse includes, but is not limited to, vaginal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger; anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue, or finger; and oral copulation (mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact), no matter how slight the penetration or contact.

Respondent refers to the person against whom the allegation or complaint of discrimination or harassment is made.  Under this policy, respondents include employees and students of Emory University, vendors, contractors, guests, patrons, and other third parties participating in any Emory-sponsored event or program, whether on or off campus, and to such persons in other situations in which a person is acting as a member of the Emory community. 

Sexual Exploitation occurs when a person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. invasion of sexual privacy;
  2. prostituting another person;
  3. non-consensual video or audio-taping of sexual activity;
  4. going beyond the boundaries of consent;
  5. observing unsuspecting individuals who are partly undressed, naked, or engaged in sexual acts;
  6. knowingly transmitting a sexually transmitted infection or HIV to another person;
  7. exposing one’s breasts, buttocks, groin, or genitals, in non-consensual circumstances; inducing another to expose their breasts, buttocks, groin, or genitals;
  8. sexually-based stalking and/or bullying may constitute a form of sexual exploitation, as well as a form of sexual harassment, as discussed above.

Sexual Harassment. Unwelcome conduct, based on sex or on gender stereotypes, which is so severe or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with a person’s university employment, academic performance or participation in university programs or activities or creates a working, learning, program or activity environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating, hostile or offensive. Sexual harassment may include, for example, an attempt to coerce an unwilling person into a sexual relationship; to repeatedly subject a person to egregious, unwelcome sexual attention or advances; to punish a refusal to comply with a sexual based request; to condition a benefit on submitting to sexual advances; sexual violence or sexual assault; intimate partner violence; stalking, or gender-based bullying.

Sexual Misconduct. Sexual misconduct encompasses sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual contact (or attempts to commit same), non-consensual sexual intercourse (or attempts to commit same), and sexual exploitation. Sexual misconduct can occur between strangers or acquaintances, including people involved in an intimate or sexual relationship. Sexual misconduct can be committed by persons of any gender or sex, and it can occur between people of the same or different sex.

Stalking. Behavior where a person follows, places under surveillance, or contacts another person without the consent of the other person for the purpose of harassing and intimidating the other person. The term “contact” means to make or attempt to make any communication, including, but not limited to, communication in person, by telephone, by mail, by broadcast, by computer or computer network, or by any other electronic device. “Harassing and intimidating” refers to communication directed at a person that causes emotional distress because of a reasonable fear for the person’s safety or safety of others, and which serves no legitimate purpose. It does not require that an overt threat of death or bodily injury be made.

1.3.6 ADDITIONAL UNIVERSITY RESOURCES

All Emergencies (any campus/location) 9-1-1

Emory Police Department 404.727.6111 or 404.727.8005

Emory Police Department TIPS line 404.727.8477/TIPS

The Respect Program, Office of Student Health (Sexual Assault/Relationship Violence Response) 404-727-1514

Faculty Staff Assistance Program1762 Clifton Road NE, Suite 1100, Atlanta, GA 30322, 404.727.4328

Emory University Human Resources
Employee Relations Department
1599 Clifton Road, NE
Atlanta, GA 30322404.727.7625 

Campus Life Offices 404.727.4364

Student Health 404.727.7551

Emory Trust Line 1.888.550.8850 (for non-emergencies)

DeKalb Rape Crisis Center 404.377.1428 

Related Links

Current Version of This Policy: http://policies.emory.edu/1.3

Sexual Misconduct Policy (http://policies.emory.edu/8.2)

Respect for Open Expression Policy (http://policies.emory.edu/8.14

http://policies.emory.edu/1.3

Policy 8.1 Sexual Misconduct

Overview

Emory University is committed to maintaining an environment that is free of unlawful harassment and discrimination. Thus, in accordance with federal law and its commitment to a fair and open campus environment, Emory cannot and will not tolerate discrimination against or harassment of any individual or group based upon race, sex, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, genetic information, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran’s status, or any factor that is a prohibited consideration under applicable law. 
Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Emory fosters a safe learning and working environment that supports academic and professional growth of students, staff, and faculty and does not tolerate sexual misconduct in its community and will take prompt action when misconduct occurs. 
This Policy covers sexual misconduct committed by Emory University students. Sexual misconduct is a form of sexual harassment that is prohibited under federal law and the Emory University Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy (Policy 1.3). Sexual misconduct can occur in many forms, including, but not limited to, sexual harassment, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and stalking. 
The university will take seriously every allegation or report of sexual misconduct received. Emory University’s response is intended to ensure that all parties involved receive appropriate support and fair treatment, and that allegations of sexual misconduct are handled in a prompt, thorough, and equitable manner.
Concerns, complaints, or questions relating to this Policy may be directed to the staff members listed below

Lynell A. Cadray
Associate Vice Provost
Office of Institutional Equity and Inclusion
Emory University
Atlanta, GA  30322
404-712-8541
lynell.cadray@emory.edu

OR

Carolyn H. Livingston, Ph.D.
Title IX Coordinator for Students
Senior Associate Vice President, Division of Campus Life
416E Dobbs University Center, Drawer PP
605 Asbury Circle Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 727-7195
Fax: (404) 727-0281
chlivin@emory.edu

Questions may also be directed to a Deputy Title IX Coordinator. Their names and contact information are listed at the end of this document. 

Applicability

The following policies and procedures apply to situations in which a student is alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct.  Allegations of sexual misconduct not involving a student, or involving a student acting in an employment capacity, are primarily addressed through the university’s Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy (Policy 1.3).  However, a student acting in an employment capacity may be subject to this Policy as well as any applicable employment policies.

The University Title IX Coordinator monitors and oversees Emory University’s compliance with federal regulations concerning sexual harassment and discrimination. Upon receipt of a report of alleged sexual misconduct, the University Title IX Coordinator will monitor responsive action to ensure that the educational environment at Emory University is free of discrimination and discriminatory harassment. Additionally, the University Title IX Coordinator monitors the steps taken, as appropriate, to remedy the effects of the sexual misconduct on the complainant. This may include commencement of disciplinary proceedings against a respondent. 

This policy applies to sexual misconduct that occurs in connection with all academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic, and other programs of Emory, whether those programs take place in university facilities, at a program sponsored by the university at another location, or elsewhere.  

Policy Details

8.2.1. Reporting Sexual Misconduct

Reporting to the police.  Because sexual misconduct may constitute both a violation of University policy and criminal activity, persons having knowledge of a possible violation are strongly encouraged to report alleged sexual misconduct promptly to the Emory Police Department, or to local law enforcement authorities for incidents that occur off campus. The university strongly encourages survivors who have been sexually assaulted to report the assault, to seek assistance, and to pursue judicial action for their own protection and that of the entire campus community.

Confidential reporting (providing information without your name attached to it) is an available option with the Emory Police Department through the TIPS line ((404)727-TIPS/8477); however, investigative or criminal enforcement activity can be significantly limited in the case of anonymous reports.  Regardless of whether a complainant pursues a criminal complaint, the university will investigate the incident in question and take appropriate responsive action to ensure that the educational environment at Emory is free of harassment and to prevent the recurrence of a hostile environment, and, as appropriate, to remedy the effects of the harassment.

Pursuant to University Policy 4.119, Emory University’s Mandated Child Abuse Reporting Policy, unless there is an exception under Georgia law, Emory University requires all Emory University personnel, including faculty, staff, students, and third-parties, to report suspected Child Abuse of which they are made aware in their capacity of employment or duties. Child abuse includes sexual abuse or exploitation of a person who is under eighteen (18) years old. Any uncertainty about whether reporting is required should always be resolved in favor of making a report to the Emory Police Department.

Reporting Sexual Misconduct for University Action. Every university employee who is informed about an allegation of sexual misconduct involving any student is required to notify a Title IX Coordinator either directly or through their relevant reporting structure.  However, university employees who serve in a professional role in which communications are afforded confidential status under the law (e.g., medical providers, therapists, and professional and pastoral counselors) are not bound by this requirement but may, consistent with their ethical and legal obligations, be required to report limited information about incidents without revealing the identities of the individuals involved, to a Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinator. All members of the Emory University Community are encouraged to promptly report incidents of sexual harassment and discrimination.

Complaints under this sexual misconduct policy may be filed:

  1. with the University Title IX Coordinator,
  2. with the Title IX Coordinator for Students, or
  3. with a Deputy Title IX Coordinator

The complaint may be made in a written or verbal format. A reporting form is available at sexualmisconductresources.emory.edu.

Retaliation prohibited.  Federal regulations and university policy protect against retaliation directed at any individual who files a complaint or is involved in the adjudicatory process under this policy in good faith or participates in an investigation of a complaint. A complaint of retaliation may be initiated with the Title IX Coordinator for Students for any retaliatory actions resulting from the filing of a complaint under this policy. Retaliation is adjudicated under the guidelines of this sexual misconduct policy.

8.2.2. Investigation and Adjudication

The Title IX Coordinator for Students is primarily responsible for coordinating responses to complaints of possible violations of this policy, directly overseeing the investigation and adjudication of complaints, and coordinating possible remedial actions or other responses designed to reasonably minimize the recurrence of the alleged conduct as well as mitigate the effects of the harassment. The Title IX Coordinator for Students will ensure prompt, fair, and impartial investigations and resolutions of complaints alleging violations of this policy. In most cases, an investigation will be completed within 60 days; however, a longer period may be needed in some more complex cases. When conducting the investigation, the university's primary focus will be on addressing the sexual assault and not on other Emory University alcohol or drug policy violations that may be discovered or disclosed.

The filing of a sexual misconduct complaint under this policy is independent of any criminal investigation or proceeding, and except in cases where it is determined that a conduct proceeding might impede a criminal investigation or otherwise not be in the best interests of the law enforcement agency, a complainant, or the university, a university investigation will not wait for the conclusion of any criminal proceedings to commence its own investigation and take needed interim measures.

Investigation of a Complaint and Notice of Charges of Alleged Policy Violation. Title IX Coordinator for Students will appoint an investigator to examine each complaint received. The investigator will conduct a prompt, thorough, and impartial investigation of the complaint. The investigation may involve interviews of a complainant, respondent, or witnesses, collection of documents or other physical/electronic information, and other appropriate steps in conducting an investigation.  Individuals who are interviewed during the investigation will be advised that the matter is confidential and that retaliation is prohibited by this Policy. A complainant and respondent may both provide information and suggestions to an investigator during the investigation, but the investigator has independent authority to conduct an investigation as best determined by the investigator. Neither a complainant nor respondent, or anyone on behalf of a complainant or respondent, is permitted to engage in any independent investigative activity that involves contacting individuals associated with the investigation and adjudication.

At the conclusion of the review, the investigator will submit a written Report of Findings to the Title IX Coordinator for Students and the University Title IX Coordinator detailing the information that was collected.  The Title IX Coordinator for Students or University Title IX Coordinator may ask further clarifying questions of the complainant, respondent, or witnesses to supplement the Report of Findings.

The Title IX Coordinator for Students shall review the Report of Findings and determine whether there is sufficient information to support charging a student with a violation of this Policy.   If a determination is made that the available information will not support a violation, then the student will not be charged. If the Title IX Coordinator for Students determines that there is sufficient information that a student may have committed a violation of this Policy, then within 7 days after the report of findings is completed or supplemented, a written “Notice of Charges of Policy Violation” (“Notice of Charges”) will be provided to the respondent and the complainant with summary information that supports the charge(s). 

Input from the Complainant Regarding the Method of Resolution. Early on in the investigation, the Title IX Coordinator for Students will seek to determine how the complainant wishes to proceed – whether the complainant wishes to pursue a formal resolution, seeks to resolve the allegation informally, or does not wish to pursue resolution of any kind.

  1. If the complainant wishes to proceed with a formal resolution and the Title IX Coordinator for Students determines there is sufficient information to proceed with a disciplinary process, then a hearing will be conducted as outlined in section 8.2.3 (Hearing Procedures) of this policy.
  2. If the complainant wishes to proceed with an informal resolution, the Title IX Coordinator for Students may elect to initiate an informal resolution process. However, a complainant (a) should never be required to work out a problem or resolve an issue directly with the respondent without school involvement; (b) must be advised of the right to end the informal process at any time and to begin to pursue a formal complaint process; and (c) should be notified that mediation is not appropriate, even on a voluntary basis, for sexual assault allegations.  Additionally, a complainant and respondent must mutually consent to use of the informal resolution. The Title IX Coordinator for Students may elect not to pursue an informal resolution process if it is deemed not in the best interest of the involved parties or in the best interest of the university.
  3. Even if the complainant does not wish to pursue resolution, requests that no action be taken, or requests that the complaint remain confidential or elects not to participate in the process Emory has an obligation to respond to reports of sexual misconduct. The university’s ability to respond may be limited if a complainant wishes to remain anonymous. Also, no guarantees can be made to a complainant regarding confidentiality. A complainant’s request regarding the confidentiality of reports of sexual misconduct will be considered in determining an appropriate response; however, such request will be considered in the dual contexts of the university’s legal obligation to ensure a living and learning environment free from sexual misconduct and the due process rights of the respondent to be informed of the allegations and their source. Some level of disclosure may be necessary to ensure a complete and fair investigation, although the university will comply with requests for confidentiality to the extent possible. The complainant’s request may be weighed against the following factors in considering how to respond: the seriousness of the alleged sexual misconduct, the complainant’s age, whether there have been other complaints of sexual misconduct against the same respondent, and the respondent’s right to receive information about the allegations if the information is maintained by the university as an “education record” under Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). 

Authority to Impose Interim Restrictions. During the investigation and until resolution of allegations, the Title IX Coordinator for Students, University Title IX Coordinator, or designee, may issue interim restrictions, including, but not limited to the following:  no-contact or stay away orders between the complainant and the respondent, interim suspension, exclusion from areas of campus, or removal or relocation from residence halls, among other measures. Interim measures should not be construed to suggest that any decision has been made about the merits of the cases.

Acceptance of Responsibility. Within 5 days after receipt of the “Notice of Charges,” the respondent has an opportunity to accept or not accept responsibility for the charge(s). If a respondent is charged and accepts responsibility for having violated this policy, the Title IX Coordinator for Students will determine the appropriate sanction within 5 days and send written notification of the sanction imposed and the appeal process to the complainant and respondent. The sanction determination is appealable to the University Title IX Coordinator within 7 days of the notice of sanction. The University Title IX Coordinator’s determination shall be final and not appealable.

 8.2.3. Hearing Procedures  

If an investigation supports moving forward with a hearing and the respondent does not accept responsibility for the alleged conduct, the Title IX Coordinator for Students will appoint a hearing panel of three individuals, drawn from a pool of faculty, staff, and students with appropriate knowledge and training, to determine if the respondent is responsible for violations in the Notice of Charges. The appointment of the hearing panel will occur within 5 days. The Title IX Coordinator for Students will appoint one member of the panel as its chairperson. The chairperson will select the date, time, and location of the hearing, and will provide notice to all parties. All parties shall be given at least 10 days’ notice in advance of the hearing date, absent agreement by the parties to shorten the time period or extraordinary circumstances as determined by the hearing chairperson.

In hearings conducted under this Policy:  

  1. Both parties shall be given similar and timely access to information that will be used at the hearing and be given the substantially equivalent opportunities to present relevant evidence and witnesses.
  2. The proceedings shall be non-adversarial in nature. The chairperson of the Council is empowered to take such steps as may be necessary to preserve the non-adversarial character of the hearing.
  3. Both parties have the right to be present for the entire hearing, except for deliberations or recesses for the panel to discuss procedural issues.
  4. The university may require any student to attend and to give testimony relevant to the case under consideration. Signed, written statements of complainants from a respondent or from witnesses who cannot attend the hearing may be accepted at the discretion of the chairperson. The university may request the attendance of a faculty or staff member, or alternatively request that a faculty or staff member furnish a written statement.
  5. Neither the complainant nor a respondent is permitted to have attorney representation during the proceedings set forth in this Policy, including at the hearing.  However, a complainant or respondent may have an advisor, who is a current member of the Emory community (a faculty member, staff member, or a student) to provide advice and support to a student participating in the conduct process. An advisor may attend the hearing to provide advice and support to a student, but is not permitted to make statements to the hearing panel or question hearing participants.  While in a hearing, the advisor’s advice and support must be provided in a manner that does not disrupt the hearing. If a respondent’s conduct is related to pending criminal proceedings, the Title IX Coordinator for Students has the sole discretion to permit an attorney for the complainant or the respondent to attend the hearing as the student’s advisor.
  6. A complainant shall not be required to be physically present in the same room as the respondent, and at the discretion of the chairperson of the hearing panel, electronic participation by a complainant may constitute presence for purposes of any proceeding.
  7. Panel members shall be required to disclose any conflicts of interest relating to the allegations or the proceeding.
  8. Neither party shall be permitted to directly question each other or any witness at the hearing, but they may submit questions to the panel chairperson’s consideration.
  9. The panel chairperson will determine the admissibility of all evidence and testimony, as well as the relevance of all questions posed by members of the panel or submitted by either party. This determination shall be based on relevance. Rules of evidence applicable to criminal or civil court proceedings will not apply.
  10. There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all hearings (not including deliberations). The recording shall be the property of the university. Documentation of conduct proceedings, including written findings of facts, transcripts, and any audio recordings, are maintained in accordance with the applicable university document retention records.
  11. For all cases, the standard that shall be used to determine whether a violation was committed is preponderance of the evidence, i.e., it is more likely than not that sexual misconduct occurred.
  12. After all admissible evidence has been reviewed the panel shall deliberate to decide the case.  The respondent shall be found responsible or not responsible for each charge by a majority vote of the panel.

The panel chairperson will submit a written report to the Title IX Coordinator for Students containing the panel’s determination and rationale within 5 days of the conclusion of the hearing.  If the panel concludes that, under a preponderance of the evidence standard, that the respondent violated this policy, then the Title IX Coordinator for Students shall be empowered to determine appropriate sanctions and remedies. Both parties shall receive simultaneous written notice of the outcome of the hearing, sanctions and remedies imposed, and the process and deadline for submitting an appeal by either party.

8.2.3.1. Appeals

Both parties shall have the right to appeal the outcome on any of the following grounds:

  1. To consider new information, sufficient to alter the decision, or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing, because such information was not known or knowable to the person appealing during the time of the hearing.
  2. To allege a procedural error within the hearing process that may have substantially impacted the fairness of the hearing.
  3. To allege that finding was inconsistent with the weight of the information.

Appeals must be submitted in writing to the University Title IX Coordinator within 7 days from the day the parties are notified about the outcome of the case. Upon receipt of an appeal the University Title IX Coordinator will appoint an appellate review panel of 3 members from a pool of trained faculty, staff, and students. The panel will review the materials within 10 days of receipt of the appeal.  The panel will examine all documentation of the hearing to determine if there is a reasonable basis for changing the outcome, and in its discretion, can hold an appellate hearing. The panel will issue a written determination of the appeal, or may request that the University Title IX Coordinator take appropriate steps in the appeal, which may include:  affirm the original finding and sanction; affirm the original finding but issue a new sanction, which may be of greater or lesser severity; remand the case back to the hearing body to correct a procedural or factual defect; or, dismiss the case if there was a procedural or factual defect that cannot be remedied by remand.  The panel’s determinations are final and not appealable. However, the outcome of a remanded case may again be appealed under this provision. Both parties shall receive simultaneous written notice of the outcome of the appeal.

8.2.4. Support Services and Options for Students going Through the Sexual Misconduct Process

A variety of support resources are available on campus and in the community to assist students in dealing with sexual or dating violence, whether it happened recently or in the past.  A full listing of support services may be found at sexualmisconductresources.emory.edu. The Respect Program, in the Office of Health Promotion, Campus Life, http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hp/programs/respect_program/, provides education, advocacy, and support for students who have been affected by sexual and relationship violence as well as their friends and families.  Amanda Yu, Director of the Center for Healthful Living, serves as the primary point of contact for students at Oxford College.  http://www.oxford.emory.edu/life/support_services/health-education/wellness-resources/sexual-assault.dot

8.2.5. Contact Information

All Emergencies (any campus/location) 9-1-1

Emory Police Department 404.727.6111 or 404.727.8005

Emory Police Department TIPS line 404.727.8477/TIPS

Emory Trust Line 1-888-550-8850

Student Health Office 404.727.7551

Deputy Title IX Coordinators:

Candler School of Theology

Mary Lou Boice, Associate Dean, Admissions/Financial Aid
1531 Dickey Drive, 301 Candler School of Theology
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 727-6330
mboice@emory.edu 

Emory College of Arts and Sciences

Priscilla Echols
Associate Dean
212 White Hall
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 727-1499
pechols@emory.edu

Emory University Law School

Katherine Brokaw
Assistant Dean, Student Affairs
1301 Clifton Road, G111 Gambrell Hall
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 727-6809
kbrokaw@emory.edu

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing

Arnita Howard
Director of Enrollment, Office of Admissions
1520 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 712-6826
ahoward@emory.edu

Laney Graduate School

Cora MacBeth, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs                               
201 Dowman Dr, 209-D Administration Building
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 727-2611
cmacbet@emory.edu

Rollins School of Public Health

Emily Lakemaker
Assistant Director of Recruitment and Student Life
1518 Clifton Road; Grace Crum Rollins Building
Phone: (404) 727-9670
emily.lakemaker@emory.edu

Goizueta Business School

Harriet Ruskin
Director, International Programs
1330 Clifton Road, 212 Goizueta Business School
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 727-6644
harriet.ruskin@emory.edu

Oxford College

Michele Sheets
Director, Residential Education and Services
100 Hamill Street; 203 Student Center
Oxford, GA 30054
Phone: (770) 784-8383
michele.sheets@emory.edu

School of Medicine

J. William “Bill” Eley, MD, MPH
Executive Associate Dean, Medical Education and Student Affairs
100 Woodruff Circle; Suite 453
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 712-9979
jeley@emory.edu

School of Medicine

Deb Houry
Associate Professor
Steiner Building Room 107
Atlanta, GA  30322
Phone:  (404) 251-8831
dhoury@emory.edu

Definitions

Allegation. A statement by a complainant that an act of sexual misconduct has occurred.

Coercion. Coercion is inappropriate pressure for sexual activity. Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure someone uses to get consent from another. When a person makes clear that they do not want sex, wants to stop, or that going past a certain point of sexual interaction is unwanted, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive.

Complainant. The person making an allegation or complaint of sexual misconduct.

Complaint. A formal notification, either orally or in writing, of the belief that sexual misconduct has occurred.

Consent. Consent is clear, unambiguous, and voluntary agreement between participants to engage in specific sexual activity. Consent is active, not passive, and is given by clear actions or words. Consent may not be inferred from silence, passivity, or lack of active resistance alone. A current or previous dating or sexual relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent, and consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Being intoxicated does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent. In some situations, an individual may be deemed incapable of consenting to sexual activity because of circumstances or the behavior of another, or due to their age.[1] Examples of such situations include, but are not limited to, incompetence, impairment from alcohol and/or other drugs, fear, unconsciousness, intimidation, coercion, confinement, isolation, or mental or physical impairment.

Force. The use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats), and coercion that overcomes resistance or produces consent. There is no requirement that a person has to resist the sexual advance or request, but resistance is a clear demonstration of non-consent. The presence of force is not demonstrated by the absence of resistance. Sexual activity that is forced is by definition non-consensual, but non-consensual sexual activity is not by definition forced.

Incapacitation. Incapacity can result from mental disability, sleep, involuntary physical restraint, or from intentional or unintentional taking of alcohol and/or other drugs. An incapacitated person does not have the ability to give knowing consent. Sexual activity with a person who one should know to be – or based on the circumstances should reasonably have known to be – mentally or physically incapacitated, constitutes a violation of this policy. The perspective of a reasonable person will be the basis for determining whether one should have known about the impact of the use of alcohol and/or drugs on another’s ability to give consent.

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples, whether cohabitating or not, and does not require sexual intimacy. IPV can vary in frequency and severity, can occur on a continuum, and can include acts of physical violence, sexual violence, threats of physical or sexual violence, or psychological or emotional violence. Psychological or emotional violence is a broad term that results in trauma to a victim caused by acts, threats of acts, or coercive tactics, and can include acts of humiliation, intimidation, isolation, stalking, and harassment.

Non-Consensual Sexual Contact. Any intentional sexual touching by a person upon a person, that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual Contact includes, but is not limited to, intentional contact with the breasts, buttocks, groin, or genitals, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another touch you or themselves with or on any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, though not involving contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice, with any object.

Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse. Any sexual intercourse by a person upon a person, that is without consent and/or by force. Intercourse includes, but is not limited to, vaginal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger; anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue, or finger; and oral copulation (mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact), no matter how slight the penetration or contact.

Respondent refers to the person against whom the allegation or complaint of sexual misconduct is made.

Sexual Exploitation occurs when a student takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of other sexual misconduct offenses. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to the following:

Sexual Harassment. Unwelcome conduct, based on sex or on gender stereotypes, which is so severe or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with a person’s university employment, academic performance or participation in university programs or activities or creates a working, learning, program or activity environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating, hostile or offensive. Sexual harassment may include, for example, an attempt to coerce an unwilling person into a sexual relationship; to repeatedly subject a person to egregious, unwelcome sexual attention or advances; to punish a refusal to comply with a sexual based request; to condition a benefit on submitting to sexual advances; sexual violence or sexual assault; intimate partner violence; stalking; and gender-based bullying.

Sexual Misconduct. Sexual misconduct encompasses sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual contact (or attempts to commit same); non-consensual sexual intercourse (or attempts to commit same), and sexual exploitation. Sexual misconduct can occur between strangers or acquaintances, including people involved in an intimate or sexual relationship. Sexual misconduct can be committed by persons of any gender or sex, and it can occur between people of the same or different sex.

Stalking. Behavior where a person follows, places under surveillance, or contacts another person without the consent of that person for the purpose of harassing and intimidating him or her. The term “contact” means to make or attempt to make any communication, including, but not limited to, communication in person, by telephone, by mail, by broadcast, by computer or computer network, or by any other electronic device. “Harassing and intimidating” refers to communication directed at a person that causes emotional distress because of a reasonable fear for the person’s safety or safety of others, and which serves no legitimate purpose. It does not require that an overt threat of death or bodily injury be made.

Student. The term student means any person pursuing academic studies at the university. The term also includes: (1) a person not currently enrolled who was enrolled in the fall, spring, or summer term preceding the alleged violation, or (2) a person who, while not currently enrolled, was previously enrolled in Emory University and who is reasonably anticipated to seek enrollment at a future date, (3) a person who has applied to or been accepted for admission to Emory university and has accepted an offer of admission or may reasonably be expected to enroll, or (4) a person enrolled in the Emory University Pre-College Program on a credit or non-credit basis.

[1] In Georgia, minors under the age of 16 years are generally unable to provide consent, with narrow exceptions. See Georgia Code Ann. § 16-6-3, Statutory Rape.

Related Links

Current Version of This Policy: http://policies.emory.edu/8.2

Policy 1.3: Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy (http://policies.emory.edu/1.3)

Policy 4.119: Mandated Child Abuse Reporting (http://policies.emory.edu/4.119)

http://policies.emory.edu/8.2

Policy 10.12 Student Complaints

Overview

Emory University is committed to receiving and addressing written student complaints against the university, its faculty, staff, or administrative personnel in a timely manner. Appropriate procedures are described below and should be adhered to in response to student complaints. Students should first attempt to resolve their complaints with the office most directly responsible for the action being challenged. Each school at Emory has an office of Student Services that can further assist students and direct them within their specific school if they are uncertain about where to start. In addition, students may use Ask John Emory (http://www.emory.edu/CAMPUS_LIFE/askjohnemory/) to assist with routing complaints if they are uncertain or wish to log a confidential complaint, so that they may remain anonymous.

Applicability

This policy applies to current and former students that choose to make a formal written complaint against the university, its faculty, staff, or administrative personnel.

Policy Details

Documentation of Complaint

Student complaints must be submitted in writing and accompanied by relevant documentation describing

  1. the specific action, practice or decision that is being challenged
  2. the individuals involved in or with knowledge of the action, practice or decision at issue
  3. the impact of the decision
  4. what resolution is desired, and
  5. why it should be granted.

Complaint Resolution

Except in situations involving allegations of discrimination or harassment (where students may file complaints directly with the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs), Emory encourages each student to pursue complaints against faculty, staff or administrative personnel at the school or department level. Each school has its own procedures as described in the student handbook or school’s catalog. Academic or other concerns usually begin with student service personnel in each school who then typically route the concerns to the appropriate school authority. Student concerns can be effectively handled by school personnel who have expertise in the academic discipline involved, familiarity with the faculty/staff, and who have experience in handling similar school decisions made regarding its students.

To expedite a prompt resolution, complaints should include current contact information of the individual filing the complaint. In most cases, responses to the complaint, including the final decision, will be provided in writing within 30 days of receipt of the complaint. However, exceptions to this timeframe may be allowed with reasonable and regular communication to inform the student of the current status of the complaint.

Record Retention

The designated school or department representative for reporting purposes should retain the written complaint along with the resolution of the complaint, and any additional supporting documentation including emails, or other communication. In addition, an action log of all complaints received should be maintained each year.  This action log is collected by the Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness as a part of the Annual Report process. A sample is available below.

Definitions

A complaint is a written description of a problem or concern. Student complaints can be categorized into four major areas: Academic, Non-academic, Discrimination/Harassment (http://www.eop.emory.edu/home/index.html), or Appeals of any of the previously mentioned areas.

If a student has a complaint involving discrimination, harassment or sexual misconduct against an Emory employee, the complaint can be made directly to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs. Otherwise, a complaint should be filed with and handled by the relevant school or department.

The “handling official” is the person designated in each school or department to address the complaint.

Related Links

Current Version of This Policy: http://policies.emory.edu/10.12

http://policies.emory.edu/10.12

Policy 8.9 Student Vehicle Use Policy

Overview

The goal of the Student Vehicle Use Policy is to protect our students from injury while driving personal vehicles on University-sponsored activities and programs and while driving University vehicles or those rented for University sponsored-activities and programs.

Applicability

This Student Vehicle Use Policy sets forth the University's regulations and procedures for all students (graduate, professional, and undergraduate) who drive University-owned, rented, or leased vehicles (“University Vehicles”) in connection with University-sponsored activities or programs or personal vehicles in connection with University-sponsored activities and programs.

The Student Vehicle Use Policy does not apply to the rental of vehicles to be used by graduate or professional students for a University-sponsored activity or program and that is:  (1) for less than seven days, and (2) for a driving distance of no more than 300 miles one-way.

University-sponsored activities and programs are defined in this policy as all activities funded in any way through the University, such as all recognized student organizations, Residential Life, Volunteer Emory, athletic or academic, academic employment or internships, and off-campus programs.

The entire policy can be found at:  http://policies.emory.edu/8.9

Travel Policies

If a student is traveling utilizing University funds or at the request of the University, then he or she should refer to the Emory University Travel Policies found at the following site:  http://policies.emory.edu/

Section 2: School of Medicine

Student Mistreatment

The School of Medicine strives for an environment that is respectful of all community members and does not tolerate mistreatment of students. Emory students are protected by two University Policies as stated in the following two paragraphs. 

The University Equal Opportunity and Discriminatory Harassment Policy (Policy 1.3) can be found at http://policies.emory.edu/1.3 and is incorporated into this Policy.  Per Policy 1.3, Emory encourages anyone who has knowledge of discrimination on campus to report alleged violations of Policy 1.3 to the Director of Equal Opportunity Programs.  Emory faculty, administrators and supervisors are required to immediately report any complaints they receive or incidents of discrimination or discriminatory harassment they witness, to their immediate report or to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs.

The Emory University Sexual Misconduct Policy (Policy 8.2) can be found at http://policies.emory.edu/8.2 .  Per Policy 8.2, every university employee who is informed about an allegation of sexual misconduct involving any student is required to notify a Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX coordinator for the School of Medicine is:

Deb Houry
Associate Professor
Steiner Building Room 107
Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: (404) 251-8831
dhoury@emory.edu

In conjunction with the two University Policies listed above, the School of Medicine Student Mistreatment Policy addresses additional types of behavior that will not be tolerated.  Mistreatment of medical students includes, but is not limited to, students: 

Resolution Process

Student mistreatment is contrary to the values of respect, civility and community as set forth in the University’s Statement of Ethical Principles.  Students who believe they have been mistreated may seek resolution through several pathways.  Any or all of the following steps may be pursued in resolving an incident of alleged mistreatment: 

Direct Communication with the Person Alleged to have Mistreated the Student

If the student feels comfortable speaking directly with the alleged offending person to address concerns and obtain an appropriate resolution, the student is encouraged to do so. Please understand that, while this method of resolution may be successful in solving the immediate problem, Emory will be unaware of the problem and thus unable to take any additional steps that might be necessary to address broader concerns. Individuals who choose not to address the alleged person(s) to have mistreated them directly, or who have not obtained a satisfactory resolution following such a discussion, are encouraged to utilize one of the other methods outlined below for addressing their concerns. 

File and Internal Complaint (within the School of Medicine)

A student who believes he or she has been mistreated may file a written complaint (via email or hard-copy) with the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs.  The complaint should include the name(s) of those accused of mistreatment, the names of any witnesses of the alleged mistreatment, the nature of the alleged action(s), the date and times of the alleged action(s), and any adverse consequences experienced by the student. 

If the mistreatment includes alleged sexual or discriminatory harassment, the student may submit the complaint directly to the Title IX Coordinator for Students (if the complaint involves alleged sexual misconduct against a student), or to Equal Opportunity Program (EOP) (for all other allegations of harassment).   If the EAD for Medical Education and Student Affairs believes that the complaint includes sexual or discriminatory harassment, then she or he will forward the complaint to the University Title IX Coordinator/EOP.  The EOP will investigate any alleged sexual or discriminatory harassment as per University Policy 3.1 and report the findings to the Dean of the School of Medicine.

If the alleged mistreatment is not sexual or discriminatory harassment, the Executive Associate Dean will investigate the alleged mistreatment and make a report to the Dean of the School of Medicine, when possible, within 30 days of the filing of the complaint.  The Dean or his or her designee will be responsible for deciding upon and imposing disciplinary action(s).

File an External Complaint

If a student believes she or he has been subjected to unlawful discrimination, harassment, or retaliation as described in Emory University Policy 3.1, the student may file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 

The School of Medicine prohibits retaliation against a student who, in good faith, complains about or participates in an investigation of student mistreatment.  Any student who feels he or she has been retaliated against or threatened with retaliation should report the allegation immediately to the Executive Associate Dean of Medical Education.  The Executive Associate Dean will investigate the alleged mistreatment and make a report to the Dean of the School of Medicine, when possible, within 30 days of the filing of the complaint.  The Dean or his or her designee will be responsible for deciding upon and imposing disciplinary action(s).

Consensual Teacher (Faculty or Resident) - Student (Resident or Student) Relationships

The relationship between teacher and student is the foundation of the academic mission of the University. This relationship vests considerable trust in the teacher, who, in turn, bears the responsibility to serve as mentor, educator, and evaluator. In discharging this responsibility, teachers are accountable for behaving in a manner that reflects the highest levels of professional responsibility, recognizes the dignity and worth of each person at the University, and protects the integrity of the student-teacher relationship.

Teacher-student relationships carry risks of conflict of interest, breach of trust, abuse of power, and breach of professional ethics. For these reasons, teachers must not engage in any consensual sexual relationships with a student while the teacher is in a position of supervisory academic authority with respect to the student. Nor may a teacher assert any supervisory academic authority with respect to a student who was the subject of a previous consensual sexual relationship. This prohibition extends to consensual sexual relationships between a graduate or professional student and an undergraduate when the graduate or professional student has some supervisory academic responsibility for the undergraduate, to consensual sexual relationships between department Chairs and students in that department, to consensual sexual relationships between graduate advisors, Program Directors, and all others (each of whom is considered a teacher) who have supervisory academic responsibility for a student and that student.

When a teacher-student consensual sexual relationship exists, has previously existed, or develops, the teacher must decline to participate in any evaluative or supervisory academic activity with respect to the student. Furthermore, it is the responsibility of the student to inform the appropriate dean when such a relationship exists, or has existed, so that he/she will not be placed in any such situation. The appropriate dean to inform includes the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Director of Admissions and/or Assistant Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs for students in the Foundations Phase, and the Associate or Assistant Dean for Clinical Education for students in the Applications, Discovery, and Translations Phase.

The deans, department chairs, and other administrators should respond to reports of prohibited sexual relationships by inquiring further and, if such reports appear to be accurate, initiating appropriate disciplinary action or remedial measures against the teacher involved. Egregious breach of this policy is adequate cause for termination under paragraph 12(C) of the Statement of Principles Governing Faculty Relationships.

Non-consensual sexual relationships are prohibited by the non-discriminatory harassment policy.

Criminal Background Checks and Drug Testing

Emory medical students undergo Criminal Background Checks (CBCs) before matriculation as facilitated by the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS).  Acceptance to Emory School of Medicine is contingent upon the authorization of the CBC, as well as the release of its findings to Emory. The Admissions Committee will review any findings to determine what, if any, action is required. Students may also be required to undergo additional CBCs as part of their clinical activities at Emory University School of Medicine or at other institutions.  Additionally, students may be required to undergo drug testing as part of their preparation for clinical rotations, or if required to do so as an evaluation initiated to evaluate their fitness to participate in their medical education. 

A report of the AAMC-facilitated CBC is provided to Emory School of Medicine prior to a student’s enrollment. 

All positive drug tests or CBCs will be reported to the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs, and then referred to a faculty committee for further consideration.  After review of the results of the CBC and/or drug test, the committee may seek additional information from the student, in writing or via interview.

Given the reports and the follow-up information provided, the committee will provide the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs with one of the following recommendations:

  1. Revocation of the acceptance to Emory University School of Medicine (for students who have been accepted but not yet enrolled)
  2. Referral to a conduct committee for further consideration (for enrolled students)
  3. No further action to be taken (for both enrolled and accepted but not yet enrolled students)

The Executive Associate Dean will consider the report of the faculty committee and relay his decision to the student in writing.  Based on the nature of the CBC report, The Executive Associate Dean reserves the right to immediately suspend a student, pending further investigation.  The student may appeal the decision of the Executive Associate Dean to the Dean of the School of Medicine in writing.

Mandatory Health Insurance

Student Health insurance coverage for sickness, accidents and hospitalization is required of all Emory students, including medical students. Coverage must be continuous from the date of enrollment until the date of graduation. The Emory-sponsored plan will be available at registration. An overview of the Emory/Aetna Student Health Insurance Policy is available at http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hs/hs_manins_emory_aetna.php.

Students who do not enroll in this plan are required to complete an online waiver process at www.opus.emory.edu confirming that the coverage is comparable and meets Emory University waiver criteria. The Health Insurance Waiver site will open on May 2, 2014 and will remain open until August 27, 2014. Students will have unlimited access to the waiver site during this time. If a waiver is not successfully completed by July 1st, students will be charged and enrolled in the Emory/Aetna policy (via their pre-term bill) but will still have until August 28th to successfully complete the waiver process.

Maintaining health insurance coverage is a requirement for continued enrollment. Be sure to always register in the School of Medicine insurance option so your insurance never lags. Please note that this requirement applies to Emory employees who are taking classes as a part of a degree-seeking program and to the children of Emory employees.  Even if you have Emory employee insurance, you must complete a waiver if you do not wish to be enrolled in the student insurance plan.

Students must complete the health insurance waiver process for EACH year they are enrolled at Emory. If using the Emory Student Health Plan ALWAYS enroll in the SCHOOL OF MEDICINE so your insurance NEVER lapses.

Additionally, as a result of national healthcare reform, students may now be eligible to remain on a parent's insurance plan until age 26.  You may want to contact your insurance carrier if you have questions about this legislation.

Industry Relations

The primary missions of the School of Medicine are to provide outstanding educational programs for medical and graduate students and trainees; to provide the highest standard of clinical care for patients; to develop outstanding, knowledgeable physicians and scientists who serve the community and the world; and to conduct innovative and collaborative research and integrate this knowledge into the practice of medicine. The School of Medicine is committed to ensuring that its faculty, staff, students, and trainees strive for the highest degree of ethical and professional standards in carrying out its missions. As part of this commitment, the School supports principled relationships with industry in which its faculty, staff, students, and trainees collaborate with industry on advances in science and medicine that enhance Emory’s missions and are beneficial to the public.

Industry has a long history of principled collaborations with academic faculty that have contributed to our educational, clinical, service, and research missions in ways that benefit individual and public health through the development of new drugs, devices, equipment, computer technology, therapies, and services. For example, industry provides grants to Emory University to fund clinical trials and other research conducted by faculty; and faculty consult with industry to advise on research directions and health needs.

The primary intent of this policy is to support faculty, staff, students, and trainees in effectively engaging in principled relationships with outside entities. The individual, the School and University can work together to enhance the beneficial outcomes of principled personal external relationships and to prevent situations that might create actual or perceived conflicts of interest and might harm the public, the institution, or the individual.   The entire policy can be found at:

http://www.med.emory.edu/administration/policies/industry_relations/index.html

Policies that directly affect medical students include the following.

Emory students:

Additional regulations in this policy include:

Any violation of this policy by a student will be considered unprofessional behavior and will subject the student to actions by the appropriate Progress and Promotions Committee or by a Conduct Committee appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs.

Involuntary Withdrawal and Readmission

Emory University considers the safety and welfare of its students, faculty and staff a top priority.  When a student engages in behavior that violates Emory’s rules of conduct, the behavior will be addressed as a disciplinary matter under the applicable Student Conduct Code.  The Student Conduct Code defines prohibited conduct and outlines a process for conducting disciplinary proceedings. 

This Involuntary Withdrawal Policy and Procedure is not a disciplinary code, policy or process.  It is not intended to apply to situations in which a student engages in behavior that violates the University’s rules of conduct.  It is intended to apply when a student’s observed conduct, actions and/or statements indicate a direct threat to the student’s own health and/or safety, or a direct threat to the health and/or safety of others.  There may be situations in which both this Involuntary Withdrawal Policy and the Student Conduct Code may apply.  In all cases, the Dean of the School of Medicine shall have final authority regarding the decision, enactment, enforcement and management of the involuntary withdrawal of a student.  

Criteria

A student may be withdrawn involuntarily from Emory University School of Medicine if the School determines that the student represents a direct threat to the health and safety of himself/herself or others by (1) engaging or threatening to engage in behavior which poses a high probability of substantial harm to himself/herself or others; or (2) engaging or threatening to engage in behavior which would cause significant property damage, would directly and substantially impede the lawful activities of others, or would interfere with the educational process and the orderly operation of the University; or (3) is unable to fulfill his/her role as a student of the healthcare profession.

Procedure

When the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs (EAD), or his/ her designee, based on a student’s conduct, actions or statements, has reasonable cause to believe that the student meets one or more of the criteria for involuntary withdrawal, he or she may initiate an assessment of the student’s ability to safely participate in the Medical School’s program. 

The EAD initiates this assessment by first meeting with the student to (1) review available information concerning the behavior and/or incidents which have caused concern, (2) provide the student with a copy of this Involuntary Withdrawal Policy and Procedure and discuss its contents with the student, (3) provide the student an opportunity to explain his/her behavior, and (4) discuss options available to the student, including counseling, voluntary withdrawal and evaluation for involuntary withdrawal.  If the student agrees to withdraw voluntarily from the University and waives any right to any further procedures available under this policy, the student will be given a grade of W for all courses in which he or she is currently enrolled, will be advised in writing of any conditions necessary prior to re-enrollment, and will be referred for appropriate mental health services.  If the student refuses to withdraw voluntarily from the University, and the EAD continues to have reasonable cause to believe the student meets one or more of the criteria for involuntary withdrawal, the EAD may require the student to be evaluated by an appropriate mental health professional.

Evaluation

The EAD may refer the student for a mandatory evaluation by an appropriate mental health professional.  The mental health professional will be selected by the EAD so long as there is no cost to the student for the evaluation.  A written copy of the involuntary referral shall be provided to the student. 

The evaluation must be initiated within five school days after the date the referral letter is provided to the student. Prior to the evaluation, the student will be required to sign a written authorization authorizing the exchange of relevant information among the mental health professional(s) and the University.  Upon completion of the evaluation, copies of the evaluation report will be provided to the Executive Associate Dean and the student. 

The mental health professional making the evaluation shall make an individualized and objective assessment of the student’s ability to safely participate in Emory’s program, based on a reasonable professional judgment relying on the most current medical knowledge and/or the best available objective evidence.  This assessment shall include a determination of the nature, duration and severity of the risk posed by the student to the health or safety of himself/herself or others, the fitness of the student to care for others, the probability that the potentially threatening injury will actually occur, and whether reasonable modifications of policies, practices or procedures will sufficiently mitigate the risk.  The mental health professional will, with appropriate authorization, share his/ her recommendation with the EAD, who will take this recommendation into consideration in determining whether the student should be involuntarily withdrawn from Emory.  A copy of the mental health professional’s recommendation will be provided to the student, unless, in the opinion of the mental health professional, it would be damaging to the student to do so.

If the evaluation results in a determination by the mental health professional that the student’s continued attendance presents no significant risk to the health or safety of the student, patients, or others, and no significant threat to property, to the lawful activities of others, or to the educational processes and orderly operations of the University, no further action shall be taken to withdraw the student from the University. 

If the evaluation results in a determination that the continued attendance of the student presents a significant risk to the health or safety of the student, patients, or others, such that there is a high probability of substantial harm, or a significant threat to property, to the lawful activities of others, or to the educational processes and orderly operations of the University, the student may be involuntarily withdrawn from the University.  In such an event, the student shall be informed in writing by the EAD of the involuntary withdrawal, of his/her right to an informal hearing, of his/her right to appeal the decision of the hearing officer to the Dean of the School of Medicine, and of any conditions necessary for re-enrollment. In the absence of extenuating circumstances, a student who is involuntarily withdrawn will be given a grade of W in all courses in which the student is currently enrolled.   

Informal Hearing

A student who has been involuntarily withdrawn may request an informal hearing before a hearing officer appointed by the EAD by submitting a written request to be heard within two business days from receipt of the notice of involuntary withdrawal.  A hearing will be set as soon as possible.  The student shall remain involuntarily suspended pending completion of the hearing.

The hearing shall be informal and non-adversarial.  During the hearing, the student may present relevant information and may be advised by a School of Medicine faculty member or a licensed health professional of his/her choice.  The role of the advisor is limited to providing advice to the student.   

At the conclusion of the hearing, the hearing officer shall decide whether to uphold the involuntary withdrawal or whether to re-consider, and the student shall be provided written notice of the hearing officer’s decision as soon as possible.     

Appeal to the Dean

The student may appeal the hearing officer’s decision to the Dean, who shall review all information presented and make a final decision as to whether or not to uphold the involuntary withdrawal.   

Emergency Suspension

The University may take emergency action to suspend a student pending a final decision on whether the student will be involuntarily withdrawn, in situations in which (a) there is imminent danger of serious physical harm to the student or others, (b) there is imminent danger of significant property damage, (c) the student is unable or unwilling to meet with the Executive Associate Dean, (d) the student refuses to complete the mandatory evaluation, or (e) the Executive Associate Dean determines such other exceptional circumstances exist that suspension is warranted.  In the event emergency action is taken to suspend the student on an interim basis, the student shall be given notice of the emergency suspension and an initial opportunity to address the circumstances on which the emergency suspension is based. 

Conditions for Re-enrollment

Because this Involuntary Withdrawal Policy applies to cases in which there is a concern about the safety of the student or others, the Dean or his/her designee may require a student who has been involuntarily withdrawn under this Policy to be re-evaluated before he/she is readmitted in order to assure that he/ she presents no direct threat to himself/ herself, patients, or others. 

Maintaining Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid

An underlying requirement for all federal, state and institutional financial aid is the need for students to meet minimum academic standards. Students who do not meet these standards may lose their eligibility for financial aid (including loans) even if they meet all other requirements of the aid programs. Some students could lose their eligibility for financial aid even if their academic program allows them to continue with their studies. These minimum academic standards are part of the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. Please note that the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy is distinct from the Satisfactory Academic Progress that governs progress and promotions.  

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

This policy has been developed to ensure that the student financial aid programs meet or exceed requirements set forth by federal regulations governing Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial aid eligibility.

Scope

This policy applies to those students receiving Title IV federal aid, state aid and university- and school-funded aid.

Students may receive financial aid for a limited amount of time, depending on the standard length of their specific academic program. The general guideline is 150% of the required time to complete the program with full-time status. For example, a student in a four-year program must complete it within six years. Students attending part-time can have their time limit extended proportionately.

Students in joint degree programs must complete both programs within 150% of the time period required for both programs combined.

Students who do not meet this requirement will be suspended from financial aid eligibility.  

Completion of Course Requirements

Students must complete with passing grades at least 75% of the credit hours for which they registered, paid fees for, and completed each academic year (fall through summer semesters). Students who fail to meet this 75% standard due to unsatisfactory or failing grades will be placed on financial aid probation. Any students on financial aid probation must complete 75% of all enrolled courses during the next academic year (fall through summer semesters), or they will be suspended from financial aid eligibility.

As soon as incomplete grades are changed to earned grades, the students’ financial aid probationary or suspension status may be lifted if the grades meet academic program standards.

Progress and Promotion

Each academic program has a Progress and Promotions Committee that meets regularly to review the academic progress of each student. If a Progress and Promotions Committee determines a student is not meeting the requirements leading to completion of the degree, that student will be placed on financial aid probation for one academic year.                 

Since the Committees are charged with evaluating students on character, professionalism, attitude and abilities in addition to academic achievement, the Committees may determine that a student is not making satisfactory progress even if the student is meeting the conditions of sections III and IV above. In the event a student is determined to not be meeting the program standards by the Progress and Promotions Committee, the Committee’s decision will prevail.

If a Progress and Promotions Committee deems that a student on financial aid probation is not meeting the program’s degree requirements at the end of the probationary year, the student’s financial aid eligibility will be suspended.

Appeals of Financial Aid Suspension

A student whose financial aid has been suspended may appeal by indicating in writing why he/she did not achieve minimum academic standards and what he/she will do to achieve these goals in the future. The letter should be directed to the Associate Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships in the School of Medicine. Each appeal will be considered on its own merit, and individual cases will not be considered as precedent.

The Associate Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships will meet with the Financial Aid Appeals Committee within one week of receiving the appeal letter. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee will consist of staff in the Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs. A majority of the Committee members present will make a decision on the merits of the appeal. The student will be advised of the Committee’s decision in writing within one week of the appeal’s consideration.

A student whose appeal is denied by the Financial Aid Appeals Committee may appeal that decision by writing a new appeal letter to the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs. The Executive Associate Dean will make a decision within two weeks of receiving the appeal letter and advise the Associate Director of Financial Aid of that decision. The Associate Director of Financial Aid will notify the student in writing within one week of receiving the Executive Associate Dean’s decision.

Reinstatement

A student shall be reinstated for financial aid eligibility at such time as he or she successfully completes sufficient hours; has achieved an acceptable grade as set forth in this policy; or has met the conditions imposed on him/her by the Progress and Promotions Committee.

It is the student’s responsibility to prompt the Associate Director of Financial Aid at the time of meeting the requirements for reinstatement.  

Enforcement

The Associate Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships shall have primary responsibility for enforcing this policy. The Office of the Registrar, the academic programs and other offices that maintain student information relevant to enforcement of the policy shall provide appropriate information to the Associate Director of Financial Aid when necessary.  

Private student loans with less favorable repayment terms may be available to cover living expenses for students who do not meet the terms of the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

Student Agreements, Consents, and Releases

Student Agreements

All medical students must enter into an agreement with Emory University and the Emory School of Medicine to follow all policies and regulations and to abide by the standards of the Conduct Code and Honor Code.  All policies and regulations included in these agreements can be found in the Student Handbook under the “Policies” section and at http://policies.emory.edu.

Students must also agree to use the systems and software required by the school for evaluation and communication. 

All student agreements will be signed upon matriculation and each subsequent year of enrollment.

Students Consents and Releases

Students must release certain information, including protected health information (PHI), to the Emory School of Medicine and allow the School of Medicine to provide this information to Emory facilities and to any outside institution that requests verification of immunization status prior to participation in any required, elective or voluntary clinical experience related to medical training at Emory School of Medicine.

Students must also release Emory School of Medicine personal and health information to agencies of the Association of American Medical College, such as the Visiting Student Application Service (VSAS) and the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS), as required for the completion of academic and clinical requirements for the degree program and application to residency and clinical service outside the Emory system. 

Students must allow the Emory School of Medicine to release information to other departments of the University, such as Student Health Services and the Office of Financial Aid, in order to verify or certify services, scholarship eligibility, or other items necessary for the continuation of enrollment and to meet all state and federal health and safety requirements. 

All students must also give their consent to be photographed and recorded.  Many of the clinical and professional skills assessments require that faculty and students view recordings of their assessments together.

If a student should refuse to provide or revoke any of these consents or releases, the student should understand that such action may affect the student’s ability to meet the requirements for the degree and eligibility to graduate and participate in the national residency match.

These consents and releases must be provided by the student upon matriculation and will remain in effect throughout the student’s enrollment or until such time as consent is revoked, in writing, by the student.

Right of Appeal

In all cases involving academic or non-academic disciplinary decisions, whether the problem is academic, psychiatric, or conduct-related, the student has the right to request a rehearing and/or to appeal to the Dean of the School of Medicine.

Part IV: Medical Education and Student Affairs Administrative Units

Executive Associate Dean

Medical Education and Student Affairs

The Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs is responsible for oversight and coordination of educational programs within the School of Medicine. These programs include Continuing Medical Education (CME), Graduate Medical Education (GME), and Undergraduate Medical Education (UME). The MD program is one of five degree programs in UME.

Contact Information

J. William Eley, MD, MPH

Executive Associate Dean, Medical Education and Student Affairs
School of Medicine
100 Woodruff Circle
 Suite 453
Atlanta, GA 30322
jeley@emory.edu
404-712-9979 office
404-310-6022 cell

Deirdre Abrams

Executive Administrative Assistant
deirdre.e.abrams@emory.edu
404-712-9979

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OMESA (Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs)

The School of Medicine Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs (OMESA) is composed of multiple units, each focused on specialized tasks to help students succeed both academically and personally so that they graduate well-prepared for a career in medicine.

Margo Kuisis, Director

Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs
100 Woodruff Circle
P384
Atlanta, GA 30322
margo.kuisis@emory.edu
404-712-8417

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Medical Education

The Medical Education unit is responsible for the medical education program leading to the MD degree, including curriculum development, program evaluation, and student assessment. It also provides central management of the curriculum, administrative support for education-related faculty committees, and schedules space for classes, conferences, and other meetings in the School of Medicine building.

Emory Center for Experiential Learning (ExCEL)

The Emory Center for Experiential Learning (ExCEL) is located in the medical school building and includes both the Simulation Center and the Clinical Skills Center. The Center is a state-of-the-art facility encompassing over 10,000 square foot of educational space. ExCEL includes spaces for low-tech task trainers, sophisticated human patient simulators, and virtual reality equipment for surgical techniques. 

Simulation rooms have the capacity for direct and remote observation and recording.  Much of the equipment will be mobile allowing integration of experiential learning into the classroom and small group learning.

The Clinical Skills (OSCE) Center is used for standardized patient education, clinical skills education, physical diagnosis and other educational experiences. It contains four suites each of which contain a central debrief room with projection capability and 4 examination rooms equipped with examination table and standard clinic equipment.

Office of Medical Education
Dr. Erica Brownfield
Assistant Dean for Medical Education
ebrownf@emory.edu
404-727-3400

Dr. Gordon Churchward
Assistant Dean for Medical Education/Student Affairs
gordon.churchward@emory.edu
404-712-9943

Dr. Doug Falls
Foundations Curriculum
dfalls@emory.edu
404-727-0520

Dr. Hugh Stoddard
Assistant Dean for Medical Education Research
hugh.stoddard@emory.edu
404-727-8451

Sherice Allen-Henry
Assistant Director of Medical Education
Program Management
sahenry@emory.edu
404-712-7967

Tyrese Hinkins Jones
Assistant Director of Medical Education
Programs, Evaluation and Training
thinkin@emory.edu
404-727-8777

Catherine Kiefer
Assistant Director of Medical Education
Programs and Assessment
catherine.kiefer@emory.edu
404-727-5718

Shontell Stanford
Assistant Director of Medical Education
Programs and Curriculum Management
smstanf@emory.edu
404-712-9938

Emory Center for Experiential Learning
Dr. Douglas Ander
Assistant Dean for Medical Education
Director, ExCEL
dander@emory.edu
404-251-8828

Reginald Adams
Senior Program Associate of Simulation Lab, ExCEL
reginald.adams@emory.edu
404-727-8955

Adam Bailey
Program Coordinator, ExCEL
adam.bailey@emory.edu
404-801-6664

Connie Coralli
Associate Director
OSCE Clinical Skills Center, ExCEL
connie.coralli@emory.edu
404-712-9925

Kim Fugate
Associate Director
Simulation Lab, ExCEL
kim.fugate@emory.edu
404-727-8961

Deborah Laubscher
Program Coordinator, ExCEL
deborah.laubscher@emory.edu
404-304-0618

Gina Shannon
Program Coordinator, ExCEL
gina.m.shannon@emory.edu
404-295-1776

Student Affairs

Student Affairs provides resources to support and promote students during their development at Emory School of Medicine. There are several sub-units within Student Affairs as outlined below.

The Welcome Center

Functions of the Welcome Center include:

The Student Affairs team of the Office of Medical Education & Student Affairs (OMESA) staff the two Welcome Centers.

Emory Campus
School of Medicine Building
Suite 375P

Kim Hemingway
Student Affairs Program Coordinator
kimberly.m.hemingway@emory.edu
404-727-5655

Shikina Sabir
Academic Records Specialist, Sr
Student Affairs
shikina.sabir@emory.edu

Grady Campus
Emory University
Faculty Office Building
Suite 102

Theresa Hicks
Secretary/Mailroom
tmhicks@emory.edu
404-778-1368

Anita Yarbrough
Senior Secretary
ayarbro@emory.edu
404-778-1367

Office of Clinical Education

The Office of Clinical Education is responsible for career counseling, advising students on the Residency Application process, coordinating all activities during the Applications and Translations Phases of the curriculum, organizing and implementing class meetings for each clinical year, and coordinating the placement of all elective students. Specifically, the major activities of the Office of Clinical Education include:

  1. Career counseling
  2. Determining student schedules during the Applications and Translations Phases
  3. Reviewing all clinical student assessments
  4. Counseling students in need of remediation
  5. Organizing and implementing several full class meetings for each clinical year

    1. Orientation to the Applications and Translations Phases
    2. How to select a Clinical Advisor
    3. The Residency Application Process
    4. Creating a Translations Phase schedule
    5. Writing student Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) letters
    6. Counseling students on selecting letter writers for letters of recommendation, residency program choices, NRMP rank list, scanning data into ERAS
    7. Coordinating SOAP days
    8. Counseling unmatched students
    9. Organizing Match Day activities
    10. Coordinating and placing all elective students, including Emory and visiting students

Office of Clinical Education
Emory School of Medicine
Faculty Office Building
49 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive, Suite 102
Atlanta, GA 30303

Dr. Joel Felner
Associate Dean of Clinical Education
jfelner@emory.edu
404-778-1372

Dr. Sheryl Heron
Assistant Dean of Clinical Education
sheron@emory.edu
404-778-5924
404-251-8867

Barbara Bingham
Clinical Education and Student Affairs Manager
bbingha@emory.edu
404-778-1372

Michele Rutherford
Academic Electives Program Coordinator
mrruthe@emory.edu
404-778-1371

Matthew Scott
Assistant Director of Clinical Student Affairs
matt.scott@emory.edu
404-778-1365

Admissions Office

The work of the Office of Admissions doesn’t end when a new class matriculates into the M1 year.  Staff continue to serve enrolled students by organizing and directing events including M1 Orientation; the annual White Coat Ceremony; Society picnics and other social events; Week on the Wards; Woodruff Weekend; student hosting of applicants; coordination of senior student participation in admissions interviews; Housing Weekend; access to the Music Room; and helping enrolled students coordinate a wide variety of student-organized clubs and events.

Entering Medical Student Health and Immunization Requirements

For the protection of the health of our students and because of the risks of exposure to infectious diseases to which medical students are subjected in the course of clinical work, certain tests and immunizations are required of all students prior to matriculation.

Entering students are required to provide documentation of all required immunizations using the Emory University Student Health and Counseling Services Immunization Form.  This form must be signed by a healthcare provider and returned to Student Health and the School of Medicine Office of Admissions prior to matriculation.

A physical examination is also required prior to matriculation to the School of Medicine and must be recorded on the School of Medicine Physical Examination Form.  This form must also be signed by a healthcare provider and returned to Emory University Student Health and Counseling Services and the School of Medicine Office of Admissions prior to matriculation.

Students will not be allowed to register or participate in any clinical activities until both forms are on file with Emory University Student Health and Counseling Services and the School of Medicine Office of Admissions.  An updated medical history and physical examination are required for re-enrollment after more than one year of attendance elapses.  For re-admission after withdrawal for medical reasons, medical clearance by designated University health officials is required.  

Registration and attendance at classes are considered as agreement to comply with the Rules and Regulations of the University as published in the Bulletin and other official publications of the University and as amended or revised during the student’s continued enrollment.

Immunization Requirements 2014-2015

Documentation of the following immunizations and tests is required prior to matriculation for all entering students:

Tetanus/Diphtheria/Pertussis – primary series of 3 doses of Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (DTP or Dtap), followed by a Tdap booster within the past 10 years.

Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR) – 2 doses of a combined MMR -OR- 2 doses of each individual vaccination or laboratory evidence of immunity to each disease.

Varicella (Chickenpox) – clinical history of chickenpox -OR- positive Varicella titer -OR- 2 doses of Varicella vaccine given at least 1 month apart.

Hepatitis B – series of 3 doses, followed by a post-vaccine quantitative antibody titer.

Tuberculosis Screening – one PPD/Mantoux skin test must be completed within 6 months and at least 2 weeks prior to matriculation.  Upon matriculation, incoming students will be required to obtain a SECOND PPD, to be administered during Orientation and at the expense of the School of Medicine.  Thereafter, students will receive PPDs at the beginning of each academic year throughout their enrollment at the expense of the School of Medicine.  Students whose PPDs convert from negative to positive (reading of >9 mm induration) while enrolled full-time in the School of Medicine Medical will be referred for care by a physician affiliated with Emory University Student Health Services and will receive their treatment at the expense of the School of Medicine. 

NOTE:  Entering students with a positive PPD are required to have a negative chest x-ray  -OR- qualifying blood test (only the Quantiferon gold or t-spot blood tests can be accepted) prior to matriculation.

Office of Admissions
Emory School of Medicine
100 Woodruff Circle, Suite 231
Atlanta, GA 30322

Dr. Ira Schwartz
Associate Dean for Student Affairs
Director of Admissions
ischwar@emory.edu
404-727-5660

June Eddingfield
Associate Director
Office of Admissions
jedding@emory.edu
404-727-8454

Shelby Smith
Admissions Program Coordinator
shelby.smith@emory.edu
404-727-0017

Cheniqua Aligwekwe
Admissions Program Coordinator
caligwe@emory.edu
404-712-9931

Faith Levy
Admissions Manager
flevy@emory.edu
404-727-8934

Financial Aid Office

The goal of the Financial Aid Office is to help students find the necessary resources to cover their medical education expenses and provide counseling to minimize and manage personal expenses while enrolled.  It reviews applications for financial assistance to determine eligibility for federal and University funds and certifies loan applications. In addition, the Financial Aid Office offers education loan indebtedness counseling for medical students.

Costs of the MD program

Medical school tuition covers a normal program of study for the Doctor of Medicine degree. In addition, students must pay the following mandatory fees each semester: Athletic Fee, Activity Fee, Immunization/Disability Fee, Mental Health Fee, Clinical Administrative Fee and Technology Fee. A one-time Transcript Fee is assessed to students for their first semester of enrollment at Emory.

A portion of the Student Activities Fee is returned to the individual classes/organizations to cover funding of appropriate class activities.  Tuition payments are divided, one-half to be paid at fall registration and one-half to be paid at the beginning of spring semester.  In the case that certain federal funds are not appropriated in future years for the support of education in the School of Medicine, subsequent increases in tuition rates may be necessary.  Tuition rates are subject to change and will affect all students unless otherwise specified.

The tuition rate for 2014-2015 for Medicine is $24,750 per semester.

The Doctor of Medicine program has two semesters of payment (Fall and Spring) per year.

Fees for 2014-2015 for the Doctor of Medicine program are:

Athletic Fees Per Semester $120

Activity Fees Per Semester $89

Transcript Fee (Entering students only) one-time fee of $70

Student Mental Health and Counseling Fee Per Semester $58

Clinical Administrative Fee Per Semester $50

Student Immunization and Disability Fee Per Semester $125

Technology Fee Per Semester $50

Each year the Financial Aid Office must estimate all normal expenses incurred by students in each academic program. In addition to tuition and fees, they include estimates for books, supplies, transportation, health insurance, food, rent, utilities, etc. This estimate is called the Cost of Attendance.

Applying for Financial Aid

Incoming MD students are encouraged to apply for financial aid as soon as possible after the beginning of the calendar year. You do not have to be accepted to begin the financial aid process.  

Students who wish to apply for need-based scholarships must complete both the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the CSS PROFILE. Parental income and assets must be included on the PROFILE regardless of the student’s age or marital status. The 2015-16 FAFSA and PROFILE are based on 2014 income, and it’s best to complete the 2014 tax returns before completing the financial aid forms.  

Students who wish to apply for federal loans only can complete just the FAFSA. Only the student (and spouse) information is required on the FAFSA.  

Detailed instructions for applying for financial aid for the MD program can be found at www.studentaid.emory.edu/apply/med  

The FAFSA is available on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The school code for Emory is 001564. The PROFILE site is www.collegeboard.org , and the school code is 0140.

The deadline to submit your financial aid documents is March 1, 2015 for incoming students. This is a target date and not a cut-off date, but students who complete their financial aid file later may miss out on some institutional funds. The deadline for returning students is May 1, 2015.

Once the university Office of Financial Aid receives your FAFSA information, they will begin to send you e-mails to let you know if other documents are required. Your financial aid file will be considered incomplete until all documents requested have been received.

The Office of Financial Aid will review your application and begin sending award letters to incoming students in April. The award letters will be electronic and will not be sent in hardcopy. Returning students will begin receiving their award letters in June.

By the time you are awarded, you will have access to Emory’s student information system OPUS. You will be able to review and accept your awards on-line, and you will be given instructions to complete promissory notes for any student loans that you accept.

Types of Financial Aid

Veterans Benefits

The university Office of the Registrar is responsible for certifying the eligibility and enrollment for students receiving veteran’s educational benefits.

Yellow Ribbon Program for Veterans

The Yellow Ribbon Program is a provision of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. This program provides additional financial support for veterans who have 100% eligibility for Post-9/11 benefits. The dependents of such veterans can be eligible for Yellow Ribbon also. Currently, one student in the MD program is awarded this funding annually in the amount of $6,000. The VA will match this amount in addition to providing any other benefits the veteran (or his/her dependent) is eligible to receive.                     

All veterans’ benefits are administered through the university’s Office of the Registrar. However, each school in the university has a specific contact for Yellow Ribbon. In the School of Medicine, the contact is the Associate Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships, Mike Behler. Interested students should contact him on May 1, 2015 for the 2015-2016 Yellow Ribbon Awards. Keep in mind that the funds are offered on a first-come, first-served basis for eligible applicants.  

For detailed information about Veterans Benefits, including the Yellow Ribbon Program at Emory, please review the information on the Office of the Registrar’s website at:

http://www.registrar.emory.edu/Students/VA/index.html.

Deferred Payment/Emory Payment Plan

The Emory Payment Plan is available to qualified students who wish to divide tuition fees into scheduled payments.  A handling fee is charged per semester by the University for participation in the Emory Payment Plan. 

Instructions are given for deduction of loans and for University-administered scholarships in listing the amount due, which is to be paid in four installments each semester according to the Deferred Payment Plan Schedule.

Contact Student Financial Services at (404)727-6095 or www.emory.edu/studentfinancials to sign up for a payment plan.

Scholarships for Medical Students

Over 80 named scholarships are available and awarded by the Office of Financial Aid based on eligibility as determined by the information students submit on the FAFSA and the PROFILE. In addition to need, there are scholarships based on merit and community service. No supplemental applications are required.

Robert W. Woodruff Fellowships

Four first-year medical and two MD/PhD students are selected as recipients of Woodruff Fellowships. Each fellowship covers full tuition and a stipend for a four-year period of study. Applicants are assessed on demonstrated qualities of forceful and unselfish character, intellectual and personal vigor, outstanding academic achievement, motivation for medicine, impressive communication skills, leadership, and creativity. A special application is not required. Individuals accepted to the initial class (through mid-March) will constitute the pool from which finalists will be selected. For additional information, contact the Office of Admissions of the School of Medicine.

Dr. G. Keith Pilling Scholarship

A four-year full tuition scholarship is awarded once every four years to a student with outstanding academic merit, financial need and is a U.S. citizen.

Loan Programs

Direct Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan – Not based on financial need; up to $47,167 per academic year; 6.21% interest rate; interest is assessed as soon as student receives full disbursement of loan but student can allow interest to accumulate and accumulated interest is added to loan amount when student begins repayment; up to 10 years to repay (may be extended up to 25 years depending on total indebtedness); no cosigner required.

Direct Federal GradPLUS Loan – Not based on financial need; can borrow up to the Cost of Attendance (see below) minus any other aid student is receiving; 7.21% interest rate; repayment begins 60 days after student receives full disbursement of loan but student can request a deferment until 6 months after leaving school; interest accumulates if student defers payments while enrolled; up to 10 years to repay (may be extended up to 25 years depending on total indebtedness); student must pass a credit check or have a credit-worthy cosigner.

Institutional Loans based on financial need; $5,000 per academic year; 4.22% interest rate; repayment begins 6-months after leaving school; up to 10 years to repay. These include: Emory Clinic Medical Loan, Medical School Dean’s Loan, Martha W. Andrews Medical Loan; AMA-ERF Medical Loan; Georgia Pediatric Society Medical Loan; Richardson Medical Loan; and Ben Smithloff Medical Loan.

Private Loans – Students are encouraged to take advantage of all institutional and federal aid before turning to private loans, which may have higher interest rates and/or lack some of the other benefits of federal aid. However, students who have reached federal loan limits or fail to meet certain academic requirements may need to look to private loans for assistance. These loans are available from some banks that participated in federal loans previously. Borrowers must be credit-worthy or have a credit-worthy cosigner. Check the Office of Financial Aid website for more information.

Emergency Loans

Students in need of emergency loans should contact the Associate Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships.  Short-term, interest-free loans are available to students in certain situations.  All emergency loans will be future dated and posted to the student’s account when issued.  On the date the emergency loan is due, this amount will become a current charge and will appear on the student’s bill in the next billing cycle.  Finance charges will accrue on the account if payment is not made by the end of the month.  Any amounts due on emergency loans will automatically be deducted from the student’s refunds at the time of registration.       

Resources/Helpful Links

Emory University Office of Financial Aid - Detailed instructions and information regarding the financial aid application process: www.studentaid.emory.edu

Emory University Student Financial Services – This is the student accounts office. They send bills, accept payment for tuition and fees, and process refunds: www.studentfinancials.emory.edu

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) - www.fafsa.ed.gov

CSS PROFILEwww.collegeboard.org

U.S. Department of Education – Official information on federal financial aid programs, including eligibility requirements and options for loan repayment: www.studentaid.gov

Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) – A wealth of information regarding financing your medical education as well as tools for financial literacy: www.aamc.org/students

Contact Information:

Mike Behler
Associate Director
Financial Aid, Scholarships and Student Affairs
mbehler@emory.edu
404-727-5683

Registrar's Office

The Registrar’s Office manages and maintains the academic records of all active and former Doctor of Medicine students. The Registrar is responsible for the registration of all students, management of all student records, verification and processing of attendance, satisfactory progress, transcript requests and degree candidate information. The School of Medicine Registrar’s Office works closely with the University Registrar’s Office. Official transcripts are only available through the University Registrar’s Office.

Registration, Cancellation, and Withdrawal

Every student is required to be registered prior to each academic year. Those who have not followed standard procedures in any way must present their plan of study for the entire medical course to the dean or the dean's designate for approval.

Registration for any term is not complete until the student is in compliance with all published procedures and until tuition and other financial responsibilities to the University have been met. Registration information may be obtained from the Office of Medical Education & Student Affairs (OMESA) or any of the program offices. After the last date for changing courses, registration may only be permitted by joint consent of the Executive Associate Dean or their designee, the director, the registrar, and the faculty of the desired courses. Registration is not permitted after eight calendar days following the date on which classes began. Tuition or housing fees are due and payable at registration each semester. Registration is not complete until the student has complied with all procedures and has met all tuition and other financial obligations.

An applicant's registration and attendance of classes is considered as agreement to comply with the rules and regulations of the University as published in the catalogs and other official publications of the school and as amended or revised during the student's continued enrollment.

Registration may be cancelled during the first week of classes as stated in the academic calendar with the precise date each semester. Cancellation of registration means that no deficiencies will be noted on the student's transcript. A student who wishes to leave the University after the first week must officially withdraw; honorable dismissal requires that this procedure be followed. Withdrawal forms may be obtained at OMESA.

Tuition refunds are partial. A student may cancel registration during the first week of the semester in which case only the deposit is forfeited (or twenty five dollars if no deposit was required). After the first week of class, a student may voluntarily withdraw, and the tuition forfeiture increases progressively. Please contact OMESA or the Bursar for a forfeiture percentage schedule. No refund is given if students drop only part of their coursework after the last day specified for approved schedule changes. No refund is given to a student who is dismissed.

Refunds for first-time Emory University students who are federal aid recipients (Title IV) will be prorated in accordance with the Higher Education Amendments of 1992 and any related regulations.

Readmission of students following withdrawal for medical reasons requires medical clearance by designated University health officials.

A student who withdraws may not continue to live in University housing or participate in student activities and is ineligible for University health services.

Student Records

The official record of each Emory University School of Medicine student is maintained in the School of Medicine. These records include information that assists in evaluating the progress of students in obtaining their medical education. Student records are kept secure and are not available to anyone other than faculty members and administrators of the School who have an appropriate need to review a student’s attendance or progress.

Other than information covered in the “Consent to Release Information” form, no information is released to external sources without written permission from the student.

While students are enrolled in the School of Medicine, the student file may contain the following:

Access to Student Records

A medical student may be granted permission by the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs or his/her designee to review the contents of his/her record but only after giving 48 hours notice. Students can contact the Director of OMESA or his/her designee in order to receive the proper paperwork.

Copies of the documents can be made by authorized OMESA staff but all original documentation must remain in the file. The OMESA Welcome Center is located in P375 in the School of Medicine.

Letters of Reference

Without exception, all requests for letters of reference or for completion of forms relating to academic performance and/or personal qualities require written authorization from the student (or graduate) for release of such information.  This also applies to requests for information from faculty or administrative officers.  Students have the right of access to letters or statements giving such information unless, in the authorization for release, the student waives this right and agrees that the information to be sent is to be held confidential.  Confidential references are often requested by agencies or institutions to which students apply for aid or a clinical position.

Refunds

Medical students who choose to withdraw from the medical school curriculum for any reason may qualify for a tuition refund on a per semester basis. Please refer to the Withdrawal Deadlines Schedule posted on the Student Financial Services webpage for the most current refund policy for complete withdrawals: http://studentfinancials.emory.edu/

There will be no refunds given after the fifth week of any semester.

Requesting Official University Transcripts

At the end of each semester, students can login to the Emory Home Page (www.emory.edu) and access the OPUS system to obtain their course grades, accumulated hours of credit, and grade point average.  Students are responsible for updating relevant statistical data such as current address, phone, and marital status or name change. If any discrepancies appear on the transcript, students are encouraged to contact the Associate Director of Registration and Student Affairs immediately so the record can reflect the correct information. 

Students can request an official transcript directly through their OPUS account.  Certified transcripts can be delivered electronically to a specifically requested agency or organization, provided the student’s financial status with the University is clear (no indebtedness except for loans with approved repayment schedules).  However, if the recipient will not accept an electronic transcript, students may request a paper copy from the University Registrar’s Office.  There is no charge to request an electronic or paper transcript.  If a student requests that the University Registrar’s Office expedite shipping of the transcript, a shipping fee will be charged to the student.  All transcripts include the entire academic record at Emory University; the Registrar will issue no partial statements of record as transcripts.  Report of performance in courses before the end of the academic year may be sent to any agency or institution by one of the School’s administrative officers on written request by the student.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their federal education records.   Detailed information pertaining to FERPA and other regulations regarding student records may be found in the Emory University Campus Life Handbook, which is located online for all medical students and students are reminded of this resource at their annual registration orientation.

For further information on official transcripts, please visit: http://www.registrar.emory.edu/Students/Transcripts/index.html

Contact Information:

Mary Kaye Garcia
Associate Director
Registration and Student Affairs
marykaye.garcia@emory.edu
404-712-9921

Multicultural Medical Student Affairs

Multicultural Medical Student Affairs recruits and provides supportive services to students underrepresented in medicine. It serves as a liaison to the Admissions Office.

Programs for underrepresented students at Emory School of Medicine include:

Student National Medical Association (SNMA)

Emory University School of Medicine has a strong and active chapter of the Student National Medical Association, an organization with the goals of increasing the number of physicians serving minority and underserved communities and developing future minority health professionals. Emory SNMA members participate in Recruitment Day Events at local colleges and universities and host undergraduates interview candidates visiting Emory School of Medicine. They also work with the Office of Multicultural Medical Students Affairs to sponsor orientation for entering students, provide informal tutoring and academic support, sponsor social events and speakers, and sponsor a big brother/big sister program for entering students. In the Atlanta community, SNMA members talk with high school students interested in medical careers, work with local churches in coordinating health fairs, and volunteer with community organizations. On four occasions the Emory SNMA chapter co-hosted the SNMA National Convention in Atlanta with Morehouse School of Medicine.

Support Programs

Tutorials and individual counseling are made available when needed for any student experiencing academic or personal situations that might interfere with their academic or personal success.

Pre-Health Advisors Program

Emory University School of Medicine maintains a strong working relationship with pre-health advisors at numerous colleges and universities throughout the country who disseminate information about Emory University School of Medicine and assist in attracting applicants.

Dr. Robert Lee,  Associate Dean/Director
Multicultural Medical Student Affairs
robert.lee@emory.edu
404-727-0016

Yolanda Hood, Associate Director
Multicultural Medical Student Affairs
yhood@emory.edu

404-727-0602

Annie Butler
Administrative Assistant
apjames@emory.edu
404-712-9937

Part V: Student Resources

Safety and Security

Emory University School of Medicine is enriched by the legacy and energy of Atlanta, while subject to possible urban crime and violence.

Every effort is made to provide a safe and secure environment for our students on all campuses.  Emory maintains its own police department that manages law enforcement, fire safety and emergency medical services.

The School of Medicine facility provides 24-hour study space for medical students with a Security Guard on duty after hours.  The entire SOM building is card-access only after hours.  The Security Guard checks student ID cards to limit the after hours use to registered School of Medicine students.

Students in need of escorts to and from parking decks or for motorist assistance on the Emory Campus are instructed to dial (404) 727-8005.  The Emory Police Department can be reached by dialing (404) 727-6111.  DeKalb County Police may be reached through the emergency 911 number.  Students on the Grady Campus dial 5-4025 or (404) 616-4025 to reach Grady Security.

Emergency "blue light" phones located throughout campus link callers directly to the department in order to report emergencies and request security escorts.

The Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response coordinates campus-wide activities related to unusual events. CEPAR uses www.emory.edu website bulletins, cell phone text messages, emails and other means to notify community members about precautions and plans.

The Emory University-affiliated hospitals have public safety departments with officers on duty twenty-four hours each day. Students are encouraged to notify the Public Safety Department at 404.712.5598 (Emory University Hospital), 404.686.2597 (Crawford Long Hospital), or 404.616.4024 (Grady Hospital) concerning any activity which may compromise the student's safety and/or the safety of other students, physicians, residents, hospital employees, patients, and visitors.


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Student Health

General

The health and well-being of Emory medical students is a top priority and essential to student success. While we encourage self-care, health promotion and prevention, medical students are not exempt from having physical and/or mental illness.

All students are expected to take responsibility for maintaining personal wellness by utilizing the multiple resources at Emory outlined below and notifying the dean’s office when personal health becomes a concern.

Student Health and Counseling Services

The mission of Emory University Student Health and Counseling Services is to empower students to take responsibility for their health and to complement the academic mission of the university by providing unified medical, counseling and health promotion services that result in a healthy campus culture. Student Health and Counseling Services is committed to providing caring professional clinical services to a diverse student body and to reducing the stigma associated with seeking mental health services. Emory University Student Health and Counseling Services is very proud to be fully accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. (AAAHC). The Emory University Counseling and Psychological Services’ Psychologist Training Program is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA).

Student Health Services

Emory University Student Health Services is located in the 1525 Clifton Road Building on the Emory Campus and provides comprehensive outpatient medical care for enrolled students. Students’ spouses, qualified domestic partners and dependents over the age of 18 on the Emory Aetna Student Insurance Plan can also be seen at Student Health Services on a fee-for-service basis.  Services available are outpatient primary medical care, physical examinations, confidential HIV testing, STI testing, post-blood borne pathogen exposure follow-up care, dermatology, contraception, IUD insertion and colposcopy, mental health and counseling, preventive medicine, sports medicine, allergy injections, immunizations, PPD tuberculin skin tests, referrals to specialists, health education, international travel information and immunizations, nutrition counseling, and alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse counseling.

Services available are outpatient primary medical care, physical examinations, confidential HIV testing, STI testing, post-blood borne pathogen exposure follow-up care, dermatology, contraception, IUD insertion and colposcopy, mental health and counseling, preventive medicine, sports medicine, allergy injections, immunizations, PPD tuberculin skin tests, referrals to specialists, health education, international travel information and immunizations, nutrition counseling, and alcohol, tobacco  and substance abuse counseling.

A  Student Health physician is available for telephone consultation when the office is closed and can be contacted by calling the EUSHS paging operator at 404-727-7551, option 0.

Professional fees for primary care visits to Emory Student Health Services and Counseling Services during regular hours are covered by Emory tuition.  Other services, such as laboratory tests, x-rays, immunizations and allergy injections are not covered by tuition and must be paid for by the student or their insurance. Charges incurred at EUSHCS are covered 100% by the Aetna Student Health Insurance Policy. The Emory Student Health and Counseling Services (EUSHCS) is now a member of 42 national PPO networks, including most major insurance carriers with the exception of Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BC/BS).  Students on BC/BS are considered out-of-network at EUSHCS and will be responsible for any charges incurred at the time of the visit. The EUSHCS will provide the necessary paperwork to submit for reimbursement. Most other insurance carriers will be billed directly. Students will be responsible for any outstanding charges that are not covered by insurance.  Payment by cash, check, Visa, and MasterCard are accepted.

Students’ spouses, qualified domestic partners and dependents (over age 18) on the Emory/Aetna Student Health Insurance Plan can be seen at EUSHS on a fee-for-service basis. 

The Student Health “Your Patient Portal” is a 24-hour Internet communication tool for Emory students.  Students can access Your Patient Portal at https://www.shspnc.emory.edu/login_directory.aspx.  By using this system, Emory students are able to communicate online with Student Health Services in a private, confidential and secure manner that meets federal HIPAA privacy standards.  Your Patient Portal can be used to schedule appointments, request prescription refills, view recent billing statements and request medical records releases.   

Appointments

The Emory University Student Health Services (EUSHS) operates on an APPOINTMENT ONLY system. Appointments are scheduled by calling (404) 727-7551 (press 1) during office hours, or you can schedule your own appointment through the on line appointment system (Your Patient Portal). You will be scheduled as follows:

For routine care, appointments are scheduled up to two weeks in advance.

For urgent conditions, an appointment or urgent consultation can be arranged for the same day.

For most acute, but not urgent needs, you may get an appointment in 24-48 hours. The only patient visits that will be handled on a work-in basis will be urgent care.

If you cannot keep your appointment, please call and cancel at least two (2) hours before the scheduled appointment time or 24 hours in advance before specialty clinics.  Charges do apply for not showing up (No Show) for a scheduled appointment.

Emory University Student Health Services:  404-727-7551
Michael J. Huey, MD, Executive Director
Student Health Immunization Nurse:  404-727-0392
www.studenthealth.emory.edu

Student Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

The Emory University Student Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) is located in 1462 Clifton Road Building, Suite 235.  CAPS provides free, confidential individual, group, and couples counseling for enrolled undergraduate, graduate and professional students at Emory University. CAPS staff also provides consultations to students and faculty or staff who is concerned about an Emory student.  Finally, CAPS provides outreach and educational workshops on a variety of topics.  

Services are provided by competent, caring psychologists, social workers, and psychology and social work trainees.  Services at CAPS are covered by the Mental Health & Counseling Fee.  CAPS also provides referrals to other agencies on campus, low-cost services in the community, or private practitioners in the community when necessary and/or requested. 

An Emory student interested in arranging an appointment can call (404) 727-7450 or come to the Counseling Center between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. Psychiatric services are available at Student Health Services at 1525 Clifton Road, phone (404) 727-7551. Counselors are on call in case of emergency.

For more information about CAPS services, visit:  http://studenthealth.emory.edu/cs/

Other after hours resources include:

   Dekalb County Mental Health Support Line: 404-892-464

In case of an emergency the Police should be called by dialing 911.

Faculty Members that Assist Students in Obtaining Psychiatric Evaluation

These individuals are designated by the Chairperson of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science and may assist students in obtaining appropriate psychiatric assistance.  They will serve as triage and may be able to help identify the most appropriate person either within the Emory Department of Psychiatry or among private practice psychiatrists in the community.  

Students on the Emory/Aetna student health insurance plan (offered by Aetna Student Health in 2014-2015) should be aware that a referral by a Student Health or Counseling Center clinician is required before seeking psychiatric and/or counseling care either at The Emory Clinic or in the community.

For a list of Emory Core providers, go to www.aetnastudenthealth.com or call the Student Health and Counseling Services Insurance Office at 404-727-7560

http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hp/index.php.

Department of Psychiatry Outpatient Psychotherapy Training Program

Please contact Jennice Vilhauer in the Dept of Psychiatry - jvilhau@emory.edu

This program is a confidential service that is staffed by senior residents with faculty supervision.  Services are charged on a sliding scale basis.  The program has proven to be helpful to selected medical students, but referrals must be made by one of the triage faculty members in the Department of Psychiatry or by the Emory University Student Health Services psychiatrist.  Although it is one of the lowest cost arrangements available, students should be aware that the clinic does not bill insurance, including the Emory student health insurance plan.   

Additional Psychiatrists or Clinical Psychologists

The Office of Medical Education & Student Affairs has compiled a list of therapists who have been of assistance to Emory University School of Medicine students in the past.  Some are full-time or volunteer faculty members; others are not.  This is only a limited list of practitioners and in no way attempts to be all-inclusive.  There are many other psychiatric and counseling care options in the community for students, and students can also consult counselors/psychiatrists at Emory Student Health and Counseling Services for recommended off campus options.  Once again, students on the Emory/Aetna student health insurance plan (offered by Aetna Student Health in 2011-2012) should be aware that a referral by a Student Health or Counseling Center clinician is required before seeking psychiatric and/or counseling care either at The Emory Clinic or in the community.

The Respect Program

The Emory University Respect Program‘s mission is to engage the Emory community to prevent and respond to sexual assault and relationship violence. To learn more about the program please contact Lauren Bernstein, the Assistant Director for the Respect Program at lauren.bernstein@emory.edu or visit: http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hp/programs/respect_program/.

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Infection Control Protocols

Needlesticks and Other Blood/Body Fluid Exposures

  1. Always observe Standard Precautions (Universal Precautions). 
  2. If you have an exposure to blood or other body fluids (e.g., needle stick, cut), immediately clean the wound with soap and water.
  3. Exposed oral and nasal mucosa should be decontaminated by vigorously flushing with water.  Exposed eyes should be irrigated with clean water or sterile saline. Eyewash facilities can be accessed quickly in the emergency department for each hospital.
  4. Follow the protocol of the hospital in which the incident occurred to the fullest including all follow-up (through the hospital’s Employee Health Service). It is especially important that you report your exposure to the hospital’s Employee Health Service as soon as possible so that a timely evaluation can be performed.  Additionally, your exposure may guide future preventive efforts (e.g., education, training, selection of devices).  If prophylactic medications are indicated, it is recommended they be initiated as soon as possible after the exposure, ideally within two hours. 
  5. If you are uncertain of the procedures for reporting and obtaining care at the facility where your exposure occurred, call the Woodruff Health Sciences (WHSC) Needlestick Hotline for assistance at 404-727-4736.
  6. Acute serology should be drawn to establish one’s baseline antibody titers to hepatitis B virus (if you have not previously been determined to be HBsAb positive [immune to Hepatitis B]) and, if indicated, to HIV and/or Hepatitis C Virus [HCV] (if the source patient is HIV-positive or HCV-positive).
  7. Depending on the results of one’s serology and the baseline serology of the patient (from which the incident occurred), you may need follow-up serologies as per the hospital protocol where the injury occurred.
  8. If the source patient is HIV-infected, the administration of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP or “prophylactic” antiretroviral medications) to decrease the risk of patient-to-health care worker transmission should be strongly considered.  Medications may be initiated pending results of HIV serology on the source patient.  If used, these medications should be taken as soon as possible after the needlestick injury.  The hospitals have protocols and will counsel you and give advice as needed.  PEP regimens are complicated; therefore be sure that the individual who manages your exposure consults with the Hospital Epidemiologist (see list below).  Again, call the WHSC Needlestick Hotline 404-727-4736 if you have any questions about management of the needlestick or other occupational exposure.
  9. The following list of specific areas and/or individuals should be contacted at the facility in which the exposure occurs:

Grady Memorial Hospital and Affiliated Sites
Daytime hours, Monday thru Friday:        
Employee Health Service call 404-616-7849 (STIX) or 404-616-4600

After hours and on weekends: 
Occupational Health Services - Call 404-616-7849 (STIX) to leave a voicemail with exposure retails. You will be instructed to contact the On-Call Health System Administrator at 404-319-7367.

Dr. Susan Ray, Hospital Epidemiologist, Division of Infectious Diseases
Office: 404-251-8712, Pager: 404-686-5500 ID# 17255; Home: 404-373-8537

If you are unable to reach any of the above individuals, call the WHSC Needlestick Hotline 404-727-4736.

VA Medical Center
Daytime hours, Monday thru Friday: Occupational Health, CLC Room 2C
Joyce Thompson RN:  404-321-6111, Ext. 6472

After hours and on weekends:  Emergency Room 404-321-6111, Ext. 6640
Dr. David Rimland, Division of Infectious Diseases
Office: 404-321-6111, ext. 6165; Pager: 404-722-3122; Home: 770-393-8951

Dr. Robert Gaynes, Division of Infectious Diseases
Office:  404-321-6111, ext. 7508; Pager: Pager 404-485-7918

If you are unable to reach any of the above individuals, call the WHSC Needlestick Hotline 404-727-4736.

Emory University Hospital - Midtown
Daytime hours, Monday thru Friday (7 am to 4 pm):
Employee Health Service 404-686-2352

After hours, and on weekends:
Page Administrative Nursing Supervisor (PIC#11917)
Dr. Jesse Jacob, Division of Infectious Diseases
Office: 404-686-1564; Pager: 404-686-5500, ID# 16623; Home: 404-876-4717

If you are unable to reach any of the above individuals, call the WHSC Needlestick Hotline 404-727-4736.

Emory University Hospital
Daytime hours, Monday thru Friday (7 am to 4 pm):
Employee Health/Occupational Injury Management Office - 1364 Clifton Road, Room D219

Occupational Injury Management (Worker's Compensation) 404-686-8587
Employee Health Services 404-686-8589

After hours and on weekends:
Page Administrative Nursing Supervisor (PIC#13087)
Emergency Room 404-712-7100
Dr. Bruce Ribner, Hospital Epidemiologist, Emory University Hospital and Emory Division of Infectious Diseases Office:  404-727-1580; Pager: 404-686-5500, PIC# 15326; Home: 404-417 0225

If you are unable to reach any of the above individuals, call the WHSC Needlestick Hotline 404-727-4736.

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Egleston or Scottish Rite)
Daytime hours, Monday thru Friday:
Employee Health, Digital Pager 1-800-682-4549 or Needlestick Hotline (ext. 4444 at Egleston and ext. 824444 at Scottish Rite)

After hours and on weekends: same as above.
Dr. Harry Keyserling, Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Office: 404-727-5642; Digital Pager: 770-839-5679; Home: 404-377-8535

If you are unable to contact any of the above individuals, call the WHSC Needlestick Hotline 404-727-4736.
Any of the following physicians may be contacted for assistance and additional advice, but the injury should first be reported as outlined in #9, above, for immediate help.
Henry M. Blumberg, M.D., Grady Memorial Hospital, 404-727-5096
Harry Keyserling, M.D., Egleston Hospital, 404-727-5642
Susan M. Ray, M.D., Grady Memorial Hospital, 404-251-8712
David Rimland, M.D., VA Medical Center, 404-321-6111, Ext. 6165
Bruce Ribner, M.D., M.P.H. Emory University Hospital, 404-727-1580
J. William Eley, M.D., M.P.H., Medical School Administration, 404-310-6022
Jesse Jacob, M.D., Emory University Hospital Midtown, 404-686-1564

The cost of the follow-up and necessary medications may be borne by Emory University Affiliated Hospitals or may need to be submitted through the student’s health insurance. Any uncovered costs will be covered through the Office of Medical Education & Student Affairs if the following procedures are followed below.

IMPORTANT:  For medical students and students in the health professions, initial evaluation of the exposure should be as above. Following this initial evaluation, all incidents and follow-up for exposures occurring at a hospital should be reported within 4 days to the Director of the Office of Medical Education & Student Affairs, Margo Kuisis, or her designee in the Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs at Emory University (404-727-5655 or margo.kuisis@emory.edu), i.e., incident report and follow-up plans.

Conversions

PPD tuberculin skin tests will be performed every year (at a minimum) or at the time of exposure for medical students. Those with PPD conversions will be referred to an appropriate physician in the University Health Services for follow-up. Expense of drugs, x-rays, and laboratory testing will be covered as long as protocol is followed.

Students Infected with HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C

Emory University School of Medicine requires any student who is infected with Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus “e” antigen positive, or Hepatitis C virus to notify the Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs of his/her positive status so that the School may help to define any limitations necessary on clinical rotations and make such accommodations as may be reasonable to permit the student’s continued matriculation.  

The Executive Associate Dean for Medical Education and Student Affairs, or his/her designee, will make recommendations on a case-by-case basis, utilizing the best currently available scientific knowledge and any established recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other applicable governmental guidelines regarding what, if any, limitations need to be applied to clinical activity.  In conducting this evaluation and making such recommendations, the Executive Associate Dean will consult with the student, the student’s personal physician and others, including faculty of the School of Medicine, as determined appropriate to assist in this individualized judgment.  Within the parameters of existing law the student’s confidentiality will be maintained during this process.  

Reasonable efforts to assist the student in completing the requirements for an M.D. degree will be made by the School of Medicine.  In addition, the student will be offered counseling concerning the options for the future selection of a career pathway in the profession of medicine.  

More Specific Guidelines on Students Infected with Blood-Borne Pathogens

Students should be allowed to complete the M.D. degree if at all possible with an effort by all to maintain confidentiality to the degree that it is possible.

In such instances, the clinical Department Chairs need not be notified of the name of an individual student involved or the type of blood-borne pathogen involved.  However, the Clerkship Director for the Departments of Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Emergency Medicine and any other Clerkship Directors (if indicated) will be informed of the name of the individual student so that any special assignments can be made if indicated.  If the student is Hepatitis B “e”-antigen positive, the Clerkship Director will be given that data.

Students will be carefully counseled concerning their potential risk to patients and their risk to themselves.  They will be instructed to be punctilious in the use of universal precautions and up-to-date hospital infection control techniques.  They will be referred to appropriate physician caregivers for optimal follow-up and therapy.

The student will also be counseled carefully about future career plans based on current medical and legal data.

Invasive procedures considered as potential risks for Health Care Workers-to-Patient transmission by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be strictly avoided by students who are Hepatitis B “e”- antigen positive.  Students with other known blood-borne pathogens will be advised on a case-by-case basis.  In general, because of their lack of experience, students with HIV or HCV infections will be advised like HBV-infected students.  Recommended practices include double gloving and not performing any procedures that have been previously identified as associated with a risk of provider-to-patient HBV transmission.

The student will be allowed to withdraw without penalty from any clinical setting that the student feels might present a risk for infectivity.

HIV-positive students should undergo screening for Tuberculosis every six to twelve months and receive pneumococcal vaccine, annual influenza vaccine, and other appropriate preventive immunizations.

The student’s condition will be re-evaluated at least annually by the Dean to determine if any additional limitations are indicated.  The student’s viral load, CD4 count and clinical status as well as the regimen of anti-retroviral therapy that is being employed can be useful in assisting in any decision making by the medical school if the student will allow the Executive Associate Dean to discuss the results with his/her health care provider.

Students who fail to show a response to Hepatitis B vaccination by serologic means will be counseled to see a physician to determine their Hepatitis B antigen status and to see if they are Hepatitis B “e”-antigen positive.  If they are “e”-antigen positive, they will be encouraged to report this finding to the Office of the Executive Associate Dean, Medical Education & Student Affairs and then to be followed as per protocol.

Emory Cares for You

Emory Cares 4 U provides culturally relevant awareness and support that fosters an integrated community of caring and enhanced well-being in order to reduce stigma and prevent suicide at Emory University.

http://www.emorycaresforyou.emory.edu/emory_cares_4_u/index.html

Crisis Numbers

404-727-6111 Emory Police or 911 off campus

1.800.273.8255 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1.800.715.4225 Georgia Crisis and Access Line 

404.727.7450 Emory Counseling Center (M-F 8:30-5:00)

404-727-7551 Psychiatry at Emory Student Health Services or

404.778.5000 for the Emory Psychiatrist on Call after hours

404-712-7100 Emory Hospital University Emergency Department

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Access, Disability Services and Resources

Students requiring assistance are referred to the Office of Access, Disability Services and Resources (ADSAR) http://www.ods.emory.edu/students/index.html. This office is responsible for managing access needs, providing ADA accommodations, and ensuring compliance with local, state, and federal civil rights regulations pertaining to disability law. All requests for classroom assistance or special accommodations for testing must be made through this office. There is a designated OMESA staff member who can provide assistance in contacting the ADSR office.

For accommodations, an assessment is given in the ADSR office.  This assessment will help determine what special accommodations are necessary.  A letter is produced from the ADSR office that indicates the type of assistance the student needs. (e.g. taking exams in a separate location, computer exams only, etc.). A copy of the letter must be submitted to the Office of Medical Education and Student Affairs Director, Margo Kuisis and to the designated OMESA staff member.  At that time the student will be informed of the procedures necessary to utilize their accommodations.

A review of accommodations and a copy of the letter should be renewed at least once a year.  

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Student Insurance

Disability

All students enrolled full-time in the Emory University School of Medicine are provided with group long-term disability insurance coverage.  For the 2013-2014 academic year this coverage is provided by The Guardian Insurance Co., Inc.  Additional information concerning the plan is available through the plan administrators, InsMed, Inc., 1-800-214-7039. All seniors will be given the option to extend the policy upon graduation if desired.  Representatives from InsMed, Inc. are available by phone to discuss the options to graduating seniors.

Liability

Full-time, fully enrolled students of Emory University School of Medicine are covered by professional medical liability insurance on their regular clerkships and while on approved elective programs at other institutions or at off-campus sites.  However, students are not covered on non-school related summer jobs or non-credit programs in which they may be engaged for which they have failed to obtain prior approval of the Dean’s Office.  Students must pay a Graduate in Residence registration fee in order to be covered.

Health

Student Health insurance coverage for sickness, accidents and hospitalization is required of all Emory students, including medical students. Coverage must be continuous from the date of enrollment until the date of graduation. The Emory-sponsored plan will be available at registration. An overview of the Emory/Aetna Student Health Insurance Policy is available at http://studenthealth.emory.edu/hs/hs_manins_emory_aetna.php.

Students who do not enroll in this plan are required to complete an online waiver process at www.opus.emory.edu confirming that the coverage is comparable and meets Emory University waiver criteria. The Health Insurance Waiver site will open on May 2, 2014 and will remain open until August 27, 2014. Students will have unlimited access to the waiver site during this time. If a waiver is not successfully completed by July 1st, students will be charged and enrolled in the Emory/Aetna policy (via their pre-term bill) but will still have until August 28th to successfully complete the waiver process.

Maintaining health insurance coverage is a requirement for continued enrollment. Be sure to always register in the School of Medicine insurance option so your insurance never lags. Please note that this requirement applies to Emory employees who are taking classes as a part of a degree-seeking program and to the children of Emory employees.  Even if you have Emory employee insurance, you must complete a waiver if you do not wish to be enrolled in the student insurance plan.

Students must complete the health insurance waiver process for EACH year they are enrolled at Emory. If using the Emory Student Health Plan ALWAYS enroll in the SCHOOL OF MEDICINE so your insurance NEVER lapses.

Additionally, as a result of national healthcare reform, students may now be eligible to remain on a parent's insurance plan until age 26.  You may want to contact your insurance carrier if you have questions about this legislation.

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Academic Assistance

Academic Counseling

All students will need to maintain grades of “C” or better or “Satisfactory” in all courses and clerkships throughout medical school.  If a student is having academic difficulty, academic counseling or tutoring may be suggested.  It is always advisable for students to seek academic assistance from instructors/course directors as a given course proceeds rather than to wait until examination time.  In spite of the expected degree of self-discipline and good study habits that students developed before entering into medical school, there are instances in which students may need assistance.  In addition, some degree of guidance is necessary when making up work lost because of illness (or any other unforeseen event). 

Students are requested to make an appointment with their appropriate Society Advisor or Associate/Assistant Dean for counsel and advice concerning academic problems unresolved by discussions with instructors/course directors.  All students select faculty advisors during the Applications Phase.  These advisors assist primarily in academic issues, as well as residency planning and preparation of the senior year schedule.

Tutoring

Students who are in academic difficulty in the first or second year of medical school (generally defined as scoring less than a passing grade at the completion of one of the Foundation courses) may request tutoring. Course Directors will work in concert with the Executive Associate Dean to develop a tutoring plan. 

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Career Advising

Statement

Choosing a medical specialty is one of the most significant decisions a medical student will make. And residency positions are increasingly competitive. At Emory, the career planning begins at matriculation and continues throughout medical school.

Career planning at Emory includes:

  1. Small Group Advisors offering career guidance and facilitating networking within and outside Emory.
  2. Exposure to a wide variety of specialties and careers through the Applications and Translations Phases (required clerkships and electives).
  3. Access to information about dual degree programs.
  4. Scheduled career advice and planning sessions during M1 and M2 Orientation.
  5. Research opportunities through the Discovery Phase.
  6. Two, one-on-one meetings with an Associate Dean for Clinical Education for career counseling and Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE)
  7. Choosing mentors, both informally for career advice, and formally to help students plan and schedule their 4th year of medical school.
  8. Three class meetings to discuss:

    1. anticipating residency applications
    2. exploring residency options – meeting with residency program directors
    3. the residency application process
  9. Careers in Medicine

The Association of American Medical Colleges Careers in Medicine (CiM) career planning program is designed to help medical students choose a specialty and residency program, successfully land a residency position, and plan their physician career.

The Careers in Medicine Web site can be assessed at www.aamc.org/cim. New users will see instructions for how to access CiM.

  1. Easily accessible deans, faculty, recent Emory graduates, and staff to contact for career advising.
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Society System

Each class is divided into 4 groups, named after 4 physicians of historic importance and renown.  The societies are a central focus of small group learning and professional development throughout the four years of medical school.

Harvey Society

William Harvey (1578 – 1657) English physician, best remembered for correctly describing the circulation of blood through the heart. In 1628, he published Exercitatio Anatomica de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus (An Anatomical Exercise on the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Living Beings), a review of his careful observations, measurements, and remarkable experiments. He subsequently was named physician to King Charles I.

Office A-167 

*Mary Dolan MD, MPH (Society Leader)

William Branch MD

Molly Eaton MD

Nancy Fajman MD, MPH 

Gary Freed DO

George Mathew MD

Louis Rapkin MD

Bijal Shah M

Semmelweis Society

Ignaz Semmelweis (1818 – 1865) Viennese obstetrician/gynecologist.  Iconoclast and advocate for women’s health, he correctly described the infectious cause of Puerperal Fever (now known to be Streptococcal post-partum infection).  Despite considerable scorn from his peers, he proved that hand washing saves lives; he is remembered as “The Saviour of Mothers.”

Office P-186 

*Lisa Bernstein MD    (Society Leader)

Wendy Armstrong MD 

Daniel Dressler MD, MSCR 

Jonathan Flacker MD

Karen Law MD

Jason Liebzeit MD

Kimberly Manning MD            

Jason Schneider MD   

Lister Society

Joseph Lister (1827 – 1912) British surgeon.  Deploring the high incidence of post-surgical wound infection and death from post-operative sepsis, Lister deduced that these diseases were preventable.  A meticulous surgeon and scientist, he applied Semmelweis’ and Pasteur’s observations to clinical practice, and used carbolic acid solutions to clean wounds, clean surgical instruments, and to clean surgeon’s hands. A shy and unassuming man, his initial work was met with indifference; his persistence and eventual vindication resulted in the development of surgery into a life-saving and safe medical practice.

Office P-18

*Nicolas Krawiecki MD (Society Leader)

Joyce Doyle MD

Lisa Flowers MD

Andrew Furman MD

Stacy Higgins MD

Clifford Gunthel MD

Michael M. Johns III MD

Joshua Wallenstein MD

Osler Society

Sir William Osler (1849 – 1919) Canadian physician. Brilliant clinician-scientist, Osler transformed the organization and curriculum of medical education, emphasizing the importance of clinical experience and applied science.  Osler's textbook Textbook of Medicine was well-written, comprehensive, scholarly, and set the standard for subsequent medical texts.  Osler was famous for many aphorisms which are still as cogent today as when he first introduced them: “To study medicine without reading textbooks is like going to sea without charts, but to study medicine without dealing with patients is not going to sea at all.”

Office A-168 

 *Mary Jo Lechowicz MD (Society Leader)

Donald Batisky MD 

Manuel Eskildsen MD, MPH

Maura George MD

Emily Herndon MD

Joseph Hilinski MD

Noble Maleque MD

Laurence Sperling MD  

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Woodruff Health Sciences Center Library

The Woodruff Health Sciences Center Library (WHSC Library) offers a broad range of services and resources that support medical education, biomedical research and clinical care. Comprehensive print and electronic collections of books and journals are accessible via web services and discoverE, the university online library catalog.  All major works can be found in permanent and course reserves, housed at the Information Desk. Library services include assistance with information and knowledge management, project management, use of multiple information sources for problem solving, biomedical imaging, and access to data sets.

Woodruff Health Sciences Library, 1462 Clifton Road – Atlanta, GA 30322 

health.library.emory.edu

Contact Information:

Informatics Center, School of Medicine Building, Room 329

Contact Information:

Emory University Hospital Branch Library, 1364 Clifton Road - Atlanta, GA 30322, Emory University Hospital, Room H-140

 Contact Information: 

Emory University Hospital Midtown Branch Library, 550 Peachtree St. NE - Atlanta, GA 30308, 5th Floor Medical Office Tower, EIMS

Contact Information: 

 Grady Branch Library, 69 Jessie Hill, Jr. Drive - Atlanta, GA 30303

Contact Information:

 To Access Resources and Services, Always start at Woodruff Health Sciences

 Center Library:

health.library.emory.edu/

 To Connect to Library Resources from Any Off-Campus Location

 To Research Questions & Topics, Download Literature, or Analyze Data, Start

 Here

 To Obtain Journal Articles from Database Search Results

  To Make Online Requests, Go To the Library’s Services page under Using the

  Library

To Contact Your Library or Service Point

 To Visit Your Library or Service Point

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Parking and Transportation

Vehicle Registration

All students operating automobiles at Emory must register with Transportation and Parking Services, 1945 Starvine Way (in the Clairmont Campus Parking Deck), immediately after arrival on campus or as soon as the vehicle is acquired.

University regulations, strictly enforced on campus, are specified in a regulation booklet furnished at the time of parking registration. Persons with vehicles on campus are expected to know and abide by these regulations. Failure to do so may result in fines and/or removal of vehicles from campus and disciplinary action as described in the code of conduct. For more information, contact Transportation and Parking Services, 404.727.PARK.

Emory University issues parking hang tags, which provide greater flexibility to those who register for University parking privileges.  One tag is issued to each registered driver, and registered drivers may transfer hangtags from one vehicle to another.  This parking permit carries the philosophy that the University registers drivers rather than vehicles.  All registered drivers share a responsibility to maintain safety and to follow the University Traffic and Parking Rules and Regulations.  All traffic and parking rules and regulations are managed by and available from the University Parking Office located at the Starvine Parking Deck on the Clairmont Campus (404-727-PARK or 404-727-7275) or http://transportation.emory.edu. 

Cars are not to be parked in the loading dock areas unless a special tag is given and are subject to towing and fines.

Emory Parking Permit Options*

Emory University parking rates are increasing this fall.  All permits will expire, and students will need to purchase new ones.

* While multiple options may work, the student should analyze which will be the lowest cost.

Please note: The annual pass can be prorated for a partial year which would be completely appropriate for students during the Foundations and Discovery Phase (if done at Emory). The other option would be available for students during the Applications and Translations Phases.  The Eagle Pass has the advantage of “online” loading for additional swipes.  Another option is to use the Cliff Shuttle or ride your bike to school. The School of Medicine has showers, bike lockers and bike racks if you desire. The OMESA Welcome Center is where you can sign up for a locker.

Parking at Affiliated Hospitals

  As students begin their clinical clerkships in their Applications Phase, instructions regarding parking at affiliated hospitals, hospital regulations, and other matters pertaining to clerkship duties are given to the students by the Office of the Dean for Clinical Education at Grady. You can reach the Grady Office by calling 404-778-1372.

Emory Midtown – Barbara Bingham will arrange.  No charge for parking.

CHOA – Emory students use Emory parking office arrangements; Visiting students arrange parking through CHOA security office.

VAMC – Students should park in the back of the hospital.  No sticker/pass or charge for parking.

Grady – Students purchase through Grady parking office.  Rate is $21.50/mo. or $5/day.  They do not prorate the parking pass fee.  Students must have a Grady ID badge prior to arranging for parking.

Transportation Services

Emory Transportation Services offer shuttles on campus, for commuters, between major affiliated hospitals and other routes such as Georgia Tech, Oxford and shopping facilities. In addition, late-night service and SafeRide are available.

Cliff routes & schedules can be found on the Emory Website.

http://transportation.emory.edu/index.html

Contact Information: Contact a Transportation Services representative or visit the Transportation Services Offices in the Clairmont Campus Parking Deck (1945 Starvine Way, Atlanta, 30322). Office Hours: Mon-Fri, 7:30 am - 4:30 pm

Phone: 404-727-1829
Fax: 404-712-9219
Email: shuttles@emory.edu

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School of Medicine Information Technology Services (SOMITS)

The School of Medicine’s Information Technology Services Department collaborates with OMESA in the delivery of student support services. Information Technology Services’ primary objective is to manage and maintain technology utilized for the delivery of the School of Medicine’s curriculum.

For help with Emory University School of Medicine’s IT Resources: Student Computing, Equipment Checkout, Public Printing, SOM Computer Labs, Mobile Video Conferencing, Audio / Visual Assistance, Classroom Podiums, Classroom Audio / Visual Training, and SOM Event Consultation.

Please call:

School of Medicine Information Technology Services 404-727-6648

Web: med.emory.edu/help Email: meded-help@emory.edu

Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm.*Standard Support Hours Excludes Emory Observed Holiday

SOMITS Student Contacts: For Help and Service 404-727-6648

Dettrick Barnes,  Curricular and Student Support Lead 404-727-5267  dettrick.barnes@emory.edu

Jess Bowling, Sr. Application Analyst jbowlin@emory.edu  404-712-8824

Jon Hamilton, Manager, Audio Visual, jon.hamilton@emory.edu  404-712-1563

Tracy Daniels –Terry Information Technology Manger

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Student Life

Campus Life

Emory University’s Division of Campus Life cultivates a welcoming and dynamic community that is committed to modeling and teaching holistic well-being, ethical leadership, civic engagement, cultural humility, and global citizenship by providing a supportive and responsive foundation for an evolving campus community to develop skills necessary for lifelong success and positive transformation in the world.

As a graduate student at Emory University, medical students not only contribute, but also have access, to the vibrant Emory community. In addition to the over 400 organizations officially recognized by the Emory Student Government Association, athletic and recreational programs, public service and leadership opportunities, Campus Life is a resource to assist you with social, career, and intellectual advancement.

http://www.emory.edu/CAMPUS_LIFE/index.html

Housing

Housing information is posted online atwww.emory.edu/HOUSING. Check out the Emory University housing websites for postings within the Emory Community: www.housing.emory.edu/off-campus. All medical students have access to a Blackboard site with additional housing resources.

Student Government and Class Officers

http://sga.emorylife.org/

For a complete and updated listing of all Class Officers and representatives please visit the School of Medicine Student Portal.

http://www.med.emory.edu/students/?p=officers

Starting a Student Organization

  1. Check the list of existing medical student organizations to make sure that there isn't already a group similar to the one you are interested in starting.
  2. Submit the following information to the Medical Student Senate (MSS) Vice President:
    1. A written constitution for your organization (a template is available online)
    2. Club Adviser, Leadership, and Membership Roster Form (available online)
      1. A listing of the current leadership for the organization, with contact information.  President and Treasurer are the minimum.
      2. Membership roster, including the 7-digit student ID numbers for students.  At least 10 members are required.
      3. Name and contact information for the club adviser (this must be a faculty member).
  3. Attend the next MSS Meeting to present your plans for your new student group.
  4. Plan events for your group and request funding as needed.
  5. Report back to the MSS about any events you hold, using the MSS Event Form (available online)
  6. If your group is doing well, after 6 months, you will be able to request a full charter for your group.  This will allow you to submit an annual budget every year.  If you are interested in moving from a junior charter to a full charter, contact the MSS VP.
  7. If your full charter is approved, make sure to submit a budget and attend the budget meeting in May!

For more information and links to online references, please visit the Medical Student Senate website at:  http://sites.google.com/site/emorymedstudentsenate/student-group-guide/starting-a-student-group.

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Student Portal

The Emory Medical Student Portal can be found at: http://www.med.emory.edu/students/

This site provides a real time calendar on curriculum and event information. The Portal includes a link to the most current version of this student handbook as well as to the School of Medicine Course Bulletin and other valuable resources or references. Be sure to bookmark it as a favorite to get up to the minute information. Updates or additions to the portal can be submitted to Margo Kuisis, Director, Office of Medical Education & Student Affairs margo.kuisis@emory.edu who will forward to the appropriate Student Portal Editor.


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Use of School of Medicine Building

Reserving Space

All student activities in the School of Medicine that require the reservation of space must submit a request for approval of your event to the OMESA Welcome Center. Once approval has been given the student leader can proceed with the following steps.

  1. https://25live.collegenet.com/emoryt/#home_my25live[0] allows you to use 25Live with your University User ID and Password.
  2. Go online and request the space and let the Welcome Center know the request is now in the system so the confirmation can be completed if time is of concern.
  3. The OMESA Welcome Center can assist you in getting a diagram of your set-up for your event to Staging in Campus Services. This is needed only if changes must be made to the space and Campus Services will need it in order to set up and return the space to its original order.
  4. All users of space in the School of Medicine must abide by the official School of Medicine space policy.  Failure to do so would prevent confirmed reservations in the future.

The Welcome Center can advise student leaders on their staging (tables and chairs) requests or needs for custodial or FMD services in conjunction with their events.

Students must use the on-line request procedures. Only one student group at a time is allowed to reserve space for a lunchtime talk. Should a need arise for another student group to use one of the smaller spaces then the second student group needs to clear that lunchtime talk with the first group that registered.

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Supplies

Equipment

Each student is required to furnish certain equipment, which must meet standard requirements of the medical faculty.  The University assumes no financial responsibility for this equipment.  Purchase of a microscope is not required.  Freshmen and sophomores have the option of using a microscope provided by the medical school at no cost.  Juniors and seniors use departmental and hospital microscopes. The course director gives specifications for diagnostic equipment at the appropriate time during the first course in which an instrument is required.  This equipment may be purchased at a number of the commercial suppliers listed in the yellow pages of the local telephone book under “Hospital Supplies and Equipment.”  More often, however, a medical student in the class handles the purchase of diagnostic equipment for all classmates who wish to purchase it.  The purchase is thus more convenient for students and without extra cost, since the student seller usually can obtain the material at reduced prices.  Laboratory coats and white coats are required for students on clinical clerkships and are available at the University Medical Bookstore. Patches for the White Coats are available from the Admissions office.

The Office of Admissions is responsible for ordering White Coats for the first year students.  Each coat has a EUSM logo patch which must be sewn onto the upper left sleeve.  A set of ID badges for laboratory coats and white jackets is also provided to students at the time of Registration and should suffice for all four years of medical school. 

Books

The Emory University Medical Bookstore, located on Oxford Road on the Emory Campus, offers books and supplies at reasonable prices to students, faculty, and staff.

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