Through their research innovations and scientific discoveries, Emory University School of Medicine faculty have profoundly transformed the understanding and practice of medicine across the world. These faculty embody an Emory tradition of service and excellence.

Mahlon DeLong, MD
Mahlon DeLong, MD

A new target for Parkinson's

For years, scientists knew that Parkinson's resulted from a loss of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the basal ganglia of the brain. No one, however, understood how this loss caused the tremor, muscular rigidity, and slowness of movement experienced by patients.

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Ernest Garcia, PhD
Ernest Garcia, PhD

Interpreting Heart Images

In 1979, clinicians were dazzled by the first images of blood flowing to the beating heart.

New cardiac imaging technology would revolutionize diagnosis of heart disease--but only after Emory imaging expert Ernest Garcia created the software needed to interpret the dancing images.

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Andreas Gruentzig, MD
Andreas Gruentzig, MD

Balloons to Restore Blood Flow

Every year, more than 1 million Americans undergo angioplasty to unblock narrowed coronary arteries, restoring blood flow to the heart.

In the 1970s, a primitive form of angioplasty existed for arteries of the arms and legs. To make angioplasty work in coronary arteries, Andreas Gruentzig developed a catheter with a small inflatable balloon molded to its tip.

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Helen Mayberg, MD
Helen Mayberg, MD

Targeting and tuning depression circuits

Dr. Mayberg leads a multidisciplinary research program studying brain mechanisms mediating depression pathogenesis and antidepressant treatment response using neuroimaging and pioneered the development of deep brain stimulation for treatment resistant depression.

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Don Stein, PhD
Don Stein, PhD

Treating Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in young people and the signature wound of soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan.

There is no truly effective treatment. At least not yet. In an Emory/NIH clinical trial under way in 17 trauma centers nationwide, TBI patients are being given progesterone within four hours after injury.

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Stephen Warren, PhD
Stephen Warren, PhD

Compensating for a faulty gene

Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. A third of children with fragile X syndrome also have autism or autistic-like behaviors.

In 1991, Emory geneticist Stephen Warren led an international team of investigators to identify the gene mutation responsible for fragile X.

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